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Introduction to African Studies – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HIST 129, POLSCI 108, ICS 110

Course Attributes: ALP, CCI, CZ

Course Description:

This course offers a broad introduction to the archaeology, history, politics, language, culture, aesthetics, and religion of African peoples. With the help of a variety of sources—scholarly works by historians, anthropologists, literary figures, filmmakers, and journalist—we will explore the ways in which Africans, across a massive and incredibly diverse continent, have responded to and engaged with the slave trade, colonial overrule, transnational markets, and to other more recent experiences and challenges after political independence.

Faculty Biographies:

Samuel Fury DalySamuel Fury Childs Daly specializes in the history of twentieth-century Africa. His research bridges West and East Africa, and it combines legal, military, and social historical approaches to the study of the past. His current project considers the history of the Biafra War (1967-1970). This book manuscript entitled Sworn on the Gun: Law and Crime in the Nigerian Civil War draws a connection between the crisis conditions of the war and the forms of crime that came to be associated with Nigeria in its wake. Using an original body of legal records from the secessionist Republic of Biafra, it traces how technologies, survival practices, and moral ideologies that emerged in the context of the fighting shaped the practice and perception of crime after Biafra’s defeat. Connecting the violence of the battlefield to violent crime, it provides a new perspective on the discursive relationship between law and disorder in the African postcolony. His other areas of interest include customary law in the British Empire, the history of vigilantism in Tanzania, and the methodologies of postcolonial African history.
 
Anne-Maria MakhuluAnne-Maria Makhulu is an Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies and Core Faculty in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, neoliberalism, the anthropology of finance and corporations, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature of South Africa. Makhulu is co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010) and the author of Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home (2015). She is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism(2010), author of articles in Anthropological Quarterly and PMLA, special issue guest editor for South Atlantic Quarterly (115(1)) and special theme section guest editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (36(2)). A new project, South Africa After the Rainbow (in preparation), examines the relationship between race and mobility in postapartheid South Africa.

S19_AAAS_103

U.S. Policy in Latin America – Spring 2019

Course Number: PUBPOL 590-04, LATAMER 590-04, POLSCI 690-2-04

Course Time: Tuesdays 4:40 p.m. – 7:10 p.m.

Course Description: 

To the extent possible, this course will examine the major elements of U.S. policy toward the hemisphere as expressed in the planning documents, policy pronouncements and legislation of the U.S. government.  We will attempt to answer the question: what were U.S. policymakers hoping to accomplish in the region and what did they, in fact, achieve? The course will also introduce students to the interagency process and the range of departments, agencies, and offices with an influence on policy formulation and implementation in the Western Hemisphere.  Finally, the course will examine in some detail key policy prescriptions: the formula for economic modernization know as “the Washington Consensus,” Plan Colombia and the War on Drugs, the Summit of the Americas process, and efforts to achieve hemispheric free trade, including the Trump administration’s decision to force a renegotiation of NAFTA.  The course will also consider the significance of the Obama Administration’s decision to restore relations with Cuba and the much-discussed “pivot to Asia.”

Patrick DuddyFaculty Biography:

Patrick Duddy, a Visiting Senior Lecturer at Duke University, was one of the Department of State’s most senior Latin American specialists with exceptionally broad experience in trade, energy, public affairs, and crisis management. From 2007 to 2010 he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for both President Bush and President Obama. Prior to this, Ambassador Duddy served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State (DAS) for the Western Hemisphere, responsible for the Office of Economic Policy and Summit Coordination, which included the hemispheric energy portfolio, as well for the Offices of Brazil/ Southern Cone Affairs and of Caribbean Affairs. During his tenure as DAS, he played a lead role in coordinating U.S. support for the restoration of democracy in Haiti.

 

U.S. Policy Poster

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda

by Mitchell Li

Eric Farnswoth Crowd

The audience asks questions of Farnsworth. photo by Catherine Angst

Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies invited Eric Farnsworth, vice president of the Americas Society and Council of the Americas, to speak about the current economic, social, and political state of Latin America and its impact the US.

Latin America has recently seen some positive political change, from the general election held in Argentina in October of last year to the Bolivian constitutional referendum of 2016. Farnsworth expressed his optimism for the region, stating that Latin American voters were moving away from populism and ideology towards pragmatism.

Farnsworth cited Colombia as a model of this trend. For the first time in over 50 years, the president of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, met with the FARC rebels to negotiate a peace deal that would end a half-century long civil war.

These positive political developments led to benefits for Washington as well. “For the first time in many years,” Farnsworth said, “you have leaders—democratically elected—who want to work with the United States to address common challenges.”

Despite a seemingly positive transformation in Latin America’s political scene, the region faces some serious challenges.

Venezuela is in a desperate economic crisis. Drug trafficking is pervading Central America, springing up in permissive environments where law enforcement is inadequate. Nicaragua’s government is working towards ensuring Nicaragua remains a one-party state, and Haiti has struggled to hold a presidential election for months.

“In my view those challenges require the assistance, and some would even say the leadership of the Unites States to help address effectively,” stated Farnsworth. He concluded his brief overview of Latin America’s state with some remarks calling Congress and the incoming president to foster a cooperative atmosphere with Latin America through future foreign policy.

During the moderated discussion that followed, former US Ambassador to Venezuela and director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Patrick Duddy and Farnsworth discussed unaddressed issues raised by the audience: from the deficiencies of education in Latin America to the United States’ antagonistic relationship with Mexico.

Eric Farnsworth’s presentation, “The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington” was sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, as for the Wednesdays at the John Hope Franklin Center series.

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