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Visualizing the Muslim Gandhi

by Kelley Reardon

As part of the Wednesdays at the Center series, the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies welcomed Tim Dobe, Th.D. and Sumathi Ramaswamy, Ph.D. for a conversation on “Visualizing the Muslim Gandhi.”

 

The John Hope Franklin Center, Duke India Initiative, and Duke Islamic Center hosted the event, which discussed the connection of Gandhi to Islamic culture. Dr. Dobe is an Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Grinnell College and a current visiting fellow at the Duke Islamic Studies Center. Dr. Ramaswamy is a James B. Duke Professor of History and International Comparative Studies at Duke, Co-Director of Duke’s India Initiative, and President of the American Institute of Indian Studies.

 

 

Dr. Dobe discussed how there is often a focus on Gandhi’s Hinduism and western influence, but less attention on his ties to Muslim culture. In his earlier years, Gandhi was often depicted in art as “a man of the people,” and he was known to put immense effort into dressing appropriately to fit in with his surroundings. For instance, there are images of Gandhi in a suit while he was training to be a lawyer, and images of him in traditional Indian dress when he returned to India.

 

Furthermore, Dr. Dobe shared many works of Khwaja Hsan Nizami, who studied Gandhi and is known for his literary pieces. Nizami even predicted that Gandhi’s legacy would extent to the year 2050, when there would be a landscape of ethics and non-violence and nearly all Muslims would be vegetarian.

 

Dr. Ramaswamy shared artistic depictions of Gandhi later in life, when he would go without clothes and present himself nothing but a loin cloth. Artists depict this stage of Gandhi’s life in different ways—for instance, the modern Indian painter Maqbool Fida Husain did not shy away from painting Gandhi’s unclothed body. Meanwhile, Sayed Haidar Raza, who was also a modern Indian painter, rarely showed Gandhi in his paintings. Yet Raza’s work is still a reflection of his perspective on Gandhi.

 

As Ramaswamy explained, “there is no single way in which Muslim artists respond to Gandhi’s barely clothed body.” There was also the potential that artists were worried about allowing their faith to stand in the way of their art. However, the limitations that faith may have had on an artist’s work can be difficult to determine.

Indian Cinema – Fall 2018

Course Number: AMES 151, LIT 211, AMI 253, VMS 231

Course Attributes: CCI, R, ALP, CZ

Course Time: Tues. & Thurs., 3:05pm – 4:20pm

Course Description:

This course will investigate sources of vitality in twentieth-century Indian cinema and the resilience of popular cinema in the face of Hollywood. Students will view both narrative and non-narrative expressive forms in folk and high culture in India. Students of this course will watch works of Guru Dutt, Satyajit Ray, G. Aravindan, and Mani Kaul.

Satti KhannaFaculty Biography:

Satti Khanna teaches courses in Indian Cinema and Hindi Literature but his love is the Hindi language, which he learned in childhood, in addition to his native Punjabi.  His classes are intensely interactive.  He prizes the use of Indian films to communicate culture.

 

 

 

India Cinema

Indian Cinema – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AMES 251, AMI 253, LIT 211, VMS 231

Course attributes: CCI, R, ALP, CZ

Course description:

Traditional Indian aesthetics emphasizes the experience of the viewer.  Less attention is paid to how the “external” world is represented; far greater attention is paid to how the “internal” world is stirred by a work of art.   In this introduction to Indian cinema, we will extend our usual way of analyzing the latent ideology of art by practicing traditional Indian sensitivity.  We will ask ourselves the following questions:  What kind of participation does a film invite? Who does it encourage us to become as we watch the film—how alert, how sensitive, how informed, how speculative?  What emotional effect does the film have upon us?  Could that effect be described as catharsis? What might traditional Indian theoreticians mean when they describe the “tasting” of basic emotions induced by a work of art as the height of aesthetic experience?

Professor biography: 

Professor Khanna’s teaching and research interests lie in the application of Indian aesthetics to film and modern Hindi literature.  He pays particular attention to the design of dhvani (resonance) in imaginative works.  Professor Khanna’s recent translations from Hindi literature have been the poet Nirala’s fictional autobiography (A Life Misspent, 2016), the novelist Mohan Rakesh’s India travelogue (Out to the Farthest Rock, 2015), and the poet Vinod Kumar Shukla’s novel (Once it Flowers, 2014).

He also interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. Professor Khanna’s recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 4

CHINA AND THE SILK ROAD

with Professor Sucheta Mazumdar

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 239, HISTORY 323

This course introduces the rich and diverse world of trade, religions, and cultures that connected the two ends of the Eurasian world. The course starts with survey of Han and Roman trade contacts, and Chinese connections with India via Buddhism, focusing on 7th-15 centuries CE. Covers themes such as the coming of Islam and Nestorian Christians to China, travelers to China during the vast Mongol Empire including Marco Polo, and voyages of the Chinese admiral Zheng He to Africa at the beginning of the 15th century which opened up the maritime Silk Roads.

 

INDIAN CIVILIZATION

with Professor John (Rich) Richardson Freeman
(CCI, EI, W, CZ, SS)
 HISTORY 219, CULANTH 215, AMES 257
Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials.

 

AFRICAN CITIES

with Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu
(CCI, SS)
AAAS 640S, CULANTH 562S
If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life–the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent–from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town–and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies.

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