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Development and Africa – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 307, CULANTH 307, PUBPOL 207, ICS 308

Course Attribute: CCI, CZ, SS

Course Description:

This course addresses the vexed issue of economic development in Africa with its many failures and occasional successes from the early colonial period to the present. Course materials focus especially on the transition from the 1960s “modernizing” moment to the millennium projects and humanitarian aid of the present. Students will read the works of development experts, World Bank executives, anthropologists, and historians, asking why this massively financed project has experienced such failure and exploring what can be done.

Charles PiotFaculty Biography:

Charlie Piot, Ph.D. University of Virginia 1986, Chair and Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies, does research on the political economy and history of rural West Africa. His first book, Remotely Global: Village Modernity in West Africa (1999), attempted to retheorize a classic out-of-the-way place as within the modern and the global. His recent book, Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War (2010), explores shifts in Togolese political culture during the 1990s, a time when the NGOs and charismatic churches take over the biopolitical, reorganizing social and political life in the absence of the state.  His current project is on Togolese who apply for and attempt to game the US Diversity Visa Lottery. 

 

Development and Africa

Whose Anthropocene? Global South Perspectives on Environmental Crisis

Course Number: LATAMER 590S, CULANTH 590S, ENVIRON 590S

Course Attributes: CCI, EI, CZ, SS

Course Time: Thursdays, 4:40pm – 7:10pm

Course Description:

The Anthropocene is defined as the epoch in which human activity has matched the scale of geological processes and disturbed Earth’s thermodynamic balance. Beyond introducing unprecedented environmental crises, the Anthropocene has revealed the inadequacy of Western scientific disciplines to address such problems. In Anthropology and Environmental Studies, promising new forms of engagement with non-Western philosophies are occurring on both sides of the Atlantic. This seminar will address the contributions of Latin American, African, and Asian authors (and artists, shamans, and activists) to the Anthropocene debate.

Renzo TaddeiFaculty Biography:

Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Federal University of Saõ Paulo, Brazil, Dr. Taddei specializes in the anthropology of environment and climate. He is also affiliated with the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

 

LATAMER590_vertical-01

Water and Society: Concepts and Controversies in Latin America – Fall 2018

Course Number: LATAMER 390, CULANTH 290, ENVIRON 390

Course Attributes: CCI, STS, CZ, SS

Course Time: Wednesdays, 4:40pm – 7:10pm

Course Description:

Water is central to the past, present, and future of humanity. Latin America has been and continues to be a place where some of the most important discussions on and events related to water and human societies occur. This course addresses the role of water in local societies, examines how environmental conflicts over water shape and reflect social and cultural diversity, and explores how water’s fate symbolizes future challenges for Latin America and the planet. This course studies water and society from several perspectives including:

  • cultural and political ecology
  • traditional environmental knowledge
  • technology and engineering
  • meteorology
  • international policy
  • arts, film, and literature

Renzo TaddeiFaculty Biography:

Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Federal University of Saõ Paulo, Brazil, Dr. Taddei specializes in the anthropology of environment and climate. He is also affiliated with the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

 

LATAMER 390 Poster

Introduction to African Studies – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HISTORY 129, POLISCI 108, ICS 110

Course attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course Description:

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender.

Professor biography:

Charlie Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, where he has a joint appointment in African and African American Studies.  His area of specialization is the political economy and cultural history of rural West Africa.  His first book, Remotely Global: Village Modernity in West Africa (1999) attempted to re-theorize a classic out-of-the-way place as within the modern and global.  His recent book, Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War (2010), explores shifts in Togolese political culture during the 1990s, a time when the NGOs and charismatic churches take over biopolitics, organizing social and political life in the absence of the state.  His current project is on Togolese who apply for and attempt to game the US Diversity Visa lottery.