Posts

Blood Letters Highlight Video

Highlights from Professor Xi Lian’s talk as part of the Wednesdays at the Center series at the John Hope Franklin Center.

“Blood Letters” is the first authoritative biography of Lin Zhao, a poet and journalist executed in 1968 at the height of the Cultural Revolution. The only Chinese citizen known to have openly and steadfastly opposed communism under Mao, she rooted her dissent in her Christian faith and expressed it in long prophetic writings done in her own blood, at times on her clothes and on cloth torn from her bed sheets. Miraculously, Lin Zhao’s prison writings survived, though they have only recently come to light. Drawing on these works and others from the years before her arrest, as well as interviews with her friends, her classmates, and other former political prisoners, Xi Lian tells the story of a young woman whom the late Noel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo called “the only voice of freedom left for contemporary China”.

Xi Lian is a Professor of World Christianity at Duke University’s Divinity School. Professor Lian’s research is focused on China’s modern encounter with Christianity. His first book, The Conversion of Missionaries (1997), is a critical study of American Protestant missions against the backdrop of rising Chinese nationalism in the early twentieth century. His second book, Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Popular Christianity in Modern China (2010), winner of the 2011 Christianity Today Book Award, examines the development of missionary Christianity into a vibrant, indigenous faith of the Chinese masses. One of his current research projects looks beyond grassroots Christianity and examines the emergence of Protestant elites and their prominent, if also precarious, role in the search for civil society in today’s China.

This event is presented by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Asian Pacific Studies Institute.

Chinese Media and Pop Culture – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AMES 435S, ISS 435, POLSCI 435

Course attribution: ALP, SS, CCI

Course Description:

The course examines contemporary Chinese media and popular culture within the context of globalization. The primary modes of inquiry are cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, and comparative, focusing on how China views itself and constructs its global images, and how the world views China through media and popular culture. The primary objective is to understand political, ideological and social changes since the Reform Era that began in 1978. It explores different aspects of Chinese media (traditional news press, radio and TV, and the internet and social media), and popular culture such as cinema, popular music and fashions, and global perception and media coverage of China.

Professor biography:

Professor Kang Liu has taught Chinese Studies at Duke University since 2003. His current research project covers global public opinion surveys of China’s image, Chinese soft power and public diplomacy, Chinese media and popular culture, political and ideological changes in China.

 

 

 

Culture and Environment in Modern Chinese History

s17_history514Course number: HISTORY 514S
Course codes: CCI, EI, STS, CZ, SS
Course description:

This course is an examination of the changing patterns through which the physical environment and culture are mutually formed in late imperial and modern China. Culture includes the creation of cosmological and social ideas as well as the long-term practices of settlement and utilization of the environment. In what ways did cultures represent limits to environmental exploitation? Special attention will be given to how communities and the state respond to environmental disasters and explore the feedback loops for protection and prevention. This course explores the importance of long-term understanding for the current environmental crisis in China.

Instructor: Professor Prasenjit Duara

Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. He was born and educated in India and received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was previously Professor and Chair of the Dept of History and Chair of the Committee on Chinese Studies at the University of Chicago (1991-2008). Subsequently, he became Raffles Professor of Humanities and Director, Asia Research Institute at National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

In 1988, he published Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) which won the Fairbank Prize of the AHA and the Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA. Among his other books are Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and most recently, The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014). He has edited Decolonization: Now and Then (Routledge, 2004) and co-edited A Companion to Global Historical Thought with Viren Murthy and Andrew Sartori (John Wiley, 2014). His work has been widely translated into Chinese, Japanese, Korean and the European languages.

Fall 2016 Feature Courses, part 1

QUEER CHINA

with Professor Carlos Rojas

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 439, AMI 439, CULANTH 439, LIT 439, VMS 439, WOMENST 439

This course examines queer discourse, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. This course focuses on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but also considers a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials.

 

WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 471, AMI 256, CULANTH 255, LIT 212, VMS 234

The WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA broadly defines national, generic, and theoretical boundaries, beyond conventional auteur, genre, one-way influence, and national cinema theories. This course also examines cinematic texts in local, regional, and global contexts and intersections. This course covers variable topics based in theoretical and political discourses on gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, global flows of people and cultures, and popular and “high” culture crossovers, traditional co-productions, remakes, translations and retellings. Previous knowledge of Korean language and culture is not required.

 

MIDDLE EAST AND LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Ellen McLarney 

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 375S, LATAMER 375S
This course will look at how Middle Eastern identities blend with Latin American ones, through migration, institutions, popular media, transnational political ideologies (Marxist, leftist, socialist, populist, nationalist, religious, or feminist), as well as through conversions and proselytizing. Solidarities across the Global South central to Latin American projects to “decolonize the mind,” to mutually inspired “liberation theologies,”, and to new kinds of non-Western feminisms will be covered. This course explores the creative conjuncture of Middle Eastern and Latin American politics and cultures, through immigration and assimilation, institution building, political activism, media production, feminism, and conversion.

CONTEMPORARY TURKISH COMPOSITION AND READINGS

with Professor Erdağ Göknar

(CCI, FL) Prerequisite – Turkish 70

Advanced grammar and syntax with intense composition component. Analytical readings in the original. Prerequisite: Turkish 70 or equivalent.

 

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Jocelyn Olcott


(CCI, CZ) – Gateway for Undergraduate Latin American and Caribbean Studies Certificate

LATAMER 230, HISTORY 330, ICS 327

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the peoples, cultures, and burning issues of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a required course for students seeking the certificate in Latin American Studies.

 

 

China’s Innovation Challenge: Overcoming the Middle-Income Trap

Professor Emeritus Arie Lewin will present his theories on China’s innovation challenge during the Wednesdays at the Center series on February 24, 2016 from 12:00pm – 1:00pm. The lecture will focus on the work of Lewin forthcoming edited volume, “China’s Innovation Challenge: Overcoming the Middle-Income Trap” (Cambridge University Press, 2016)

Professor Lewin taught in Duke’s Fuqua School of Business. Lewin’s research interests include firm wealth creation in chaotic environments through strategies of exploitation and exploration, coevolution of organizations and their environments,  and designing the super adaptive firm.

 

Watch Lewin’s introduction video to China’s Innovation Challenge:

Events

By Hook or by Crook: Understanding China’s Shifting Environmental Policy Landscape

In March 2018, China announced its most significant environmental governance reforms of this decade. Coming on the heels of President Xi Jinping securing the possibility of long-term presidential powers, the State Council presented draft plans to consolidate environmental policymaking in the newly formed Ministry of Ecology and Environment. The effectiveness of this new ministry will inform not only China’s environmental future, but also its stability, its socioeconomic ambitions, and global efforts to address environmental challenges. China’s environmental policy landscape has long been plagued by overlapping agendas and disproportionate power dynamics, which its new environmental regime seeks to address. The new ministry will become the most powerful dedicated environmental regulatory body in the history of modern China. It will deploy enforcement staff across the country, and be the instrument for applying China’s centralized environmental statutes. But coordination and enforcement challenges will not disappear with China’s ministerial consolidation, and a range of questions remain on its future effectiveness and the degree to which China will continue to expand its environmental priorities. The global stakes for success are high. China’s domestic policies have an outsized ability to influence global climate change, foment or curtail transboundary pollution, and send ripples through resource management strategies the world over from its consumption patterns. Where reforms lead to a cleaner environment in China, the world clearly benefits. Where they fall short, both Chinese citizens and the global community will bear the impacts.

 Jackson Ewing holds a joint appointment as a senior fellow at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute of Environmental Policy Solutions and an adjunct associate professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy. He works closely with the Duke Kunshan University Environmental Research Center and International Masters of Environmental Policy programs to build policy research collaboration across Duke platforms in the United States and China.

Prior to joining Duke, Ewing was director of Asian Sustainability at the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York, where he led projects on Asian carbon market cooperation and sustainable resource development in the ASEAN Economic Community. He previously served as a MacArthur Fellow and head of the Environment, Climate Change and Food Security Program at Singapore’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, and has worked throughout Asia with actors in government, the private sector, civil society, and international organizations.

Ewing publishes widely through a range of mediums and is a regular contributor to radio, television and print media. He holds a doctorate in environmental security and master’s degree in international relations from Australia’s Bond University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the College of Charleston.

This presentation is sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Global Asia Initiativement. A light lunch will be served. Parking is available in nearby Trent Rd. and Erwin Rd. parking decks. The series provides 1-hour parking vouchers to guests.