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Critical Genealogies of Middle East Studies – Fall 2017

Course number:  AMES 620S, Gateway course for the Graduate Middle East Studies Certificate

Course attributes: CCS, CZ, SS

Course description:

This graduate seminar provides a comparative analysis of foundational theoretical and intellectual texts of Middle East Studies. With an interdisciplinary focus on culture, history, politics, literature, religion, and policy, readings and presentations by experts in the field will reveal how knowledge of the Middle East is produced within the framework of specific disciplinary traditions. Secondary focus on orientalism, gender, cultural studies, literary theory, and postcolonialism.

Professors biographies:

Professor Erdağ Göknar teaches in Duke’s Asian & Middle Eastern Studies department and is the director of the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. Professor Göknar’s research focuses on the intersection of politics and culture in the Middle East; specifically, the late Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. He is also interested in exploring questions of Turkish and Muslim representation in literature, historiography, and popular culture/media. This includes examining tensions between city and nation at the nexus of representational and political power. Professor Göknar’s work has focused the political critiques of state ideology embedded in literary and historical tropes in the work of authors like Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk and on the critical role played by writers in representations of political violence such as cultural revolution, military coups and colonial occupation (a recent project addresses the Occupation of Istanbul after WWI). More generally, he is interested in political imaginaries that emerge out of cultural productions. Areas of additional focus include world literature, the global city, and cultural translation.

Professor Fadi Bardawill teaches at the University of North Carolina’s Department of Asian Studies and Department of Global Studies. He is an anthropologist (Ph.D Columbia University, 2010) who researches the traditions of intellectual inquiry, practices of public criticism, and modalities of political engagement of contemporary Arab intellectuals, both at home and in the diaspora. In doing so, Professor Bardawil investigates theoretical discourses as anthropological objects by tracking their international circulations, translations, analytical uses, and political appropriations.

Currently, he is completing In Marxism’s Wake: The Disenchantment of Levantine Intellectuals, a book that examines the ebbing away of Marxist thought and practice through focusing on the intellectual and political trajectories of a generation – born around 1940 – of previously militant, public intellectuals. I retrace the extinction of revolutionary hopes with the rise of militant sectarian and Islamist political forces, explore the vexed relation of intellectuals to political militancy, and look into the emergence of a fork in critical agendas after the rise of postcolonial critique between diasporic Arab intellectuals, and their Marxist and liberal peers at home. I am also writing an essay on Talal Asad’s work focusing on questions of the anthropologist’s positionality, modes of intellectual inquiry, and spaces of intellectual engagement that will introduce an interview I conducted with him.

 

Poetic Cinema

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S
Course codes: CCI, ALP, CZ
Course description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Instructor: Professor Satti Khanna

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 4

CHINA AND THE SILK ROAD

with Professor Sucheta Mazumdar

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 239, HISTORY 323

This course introduces the rich and diverse world of trade, religions, and cultures that connected the two ends of the Eurasian world. The course starts with survey of Han and Roman trade contacts, and Chinese connections with India via Buddhism, focusing on 7th-15 centuries CE. Covers themes such as the coming of Islam and Nestorian Christians to China, travelers to China during the vast Mongol Empire including Marco Polo, and voyages of the Chinese admiral Zheng He to Africa at the beginning of the 15th century which opened up the maritime Silk Roads.

 

INDIAN CIVILIZATION

with Professor John (Rich) Richardson Freeman
(CCI, EI, W, CZ, SS)
 HISTORY 219, CULANTH 215, AMES 257
Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials.

 

AFRICAN CITIES

with Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu
(CCI, SS)
AAAS 640S, CULANTH 562S
If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life–the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent–from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town–and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies.

Duke’s Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

Duke University’s certificate programs offer you the opportunity to diversify your degree by studying a topic or theme that spans multiple departments and disciplines. The Asian Pacific Studies Institute’s (APSI) Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate strives to provide you with:

  • A broad introduction to East Asian Studies
  • An understanding of differing disciplinary approaches to East Asian Studies
  • A minimum proficiency in at least one East Asian language (200-level or above)
    • Duke offers courses in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Tibetan
  • The skills to undertake research on an East Asian topic

Requirements

  • You must take at least six courses from the designated East Asian certificate course list.
    • One gateway course for the certificate
    • One approved capstone seminar course
    • Four elective courses at the 200-level or above, including East Asian Language courses
  • No more than three courses should be taken in any one department or program
  • You are required to develop an online portfolio that reflects your accomplishments in the certificate program.
    • Including at least 12 entries with your six certificate courses reflected
    • A digital reporting of how each piece meets the certificate goals

Application

You are encouraged to declare your interest in receiving a certificate in East Asian studies by your fifth semester.

East Asian Studies Certificate Application Steps:

  1. Register for the certificate electronically through ACES by completing a “long-range plan” and a “what if” report. Questions about this process should be directed to your Academic Advisor.
  2. Contact APSI at apsi@duke.edu or 919-684-2604 with a notification about your intention to complete the certificate. Set up an appointment for advising to learn more about specific course offerings and other important certificate requirements.

 

Fall 2016 Courses Offerings

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate gateway courses: 

Gateway Seminar: Asia Global History with Professor Prasenjit Duara

HISTORY 162S

(CCI, CZ, SS)

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

Emerging Markets with Professor Giovanni Zanalda

ECON 379, ICS 379 – Prerequisites: ECON 205D, ECON 208D and ECON 210D

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

This course analyzes the rise of emerging markets/economies and their new roles in the context of global economy. This course focuses on the post-1970s growth of countries such as China, India, South Korea, Chile, Mexico, and Brazil (and/or other countries according to students’ interests) with particular emphasis on financial, industrial/trading and institutional aspects, linking such rise to the emergence of vast global economic imbalances and new trend in capital and trade flows of the last decade. The coursework will explore economic and policy challenges these countries and their companies increasingly face and implications for the world economy.

 

Democracy and Social Choice with Professor Emerson Niou

POLSCI 333S

(CCI, SS)

This course introduces students to the study of social choice and democratic theory. Social choice theory studies the properties of political institutions by which individual preferences are aggregated into collective choices. It provides a useful and powerful analytical framework to understand the choice and consequence of various political institutions in various democratic political systems. Course topics include politics of suffrage, secret vs. open ballot, electoral systems, representative districting, term limits, presidential vs. parliamentary systems, party formation, coalitional government, etc.

 

Interethnic Intimacies with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S/515S; LIT 415S, AMI 415S, CULANTH 415S, VMS 416S, ICS 415S

Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar.

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The coursework examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other.

 

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate capstone seminar course:

East Asian Treaty Ports with Professor Simon Partner

HISTORY 518S

(CCI, R, SS)

The course will examine the treaty ports of East Asia: Shanghai, Tianjin, Yokohama, Nagasaki and others from the perspective of both foreign and local residents. Students will review available English language sources, and carry out a research project on a city of their choice.

Global Asia Initiative

In the spring of 2016, Duke University’s Global Asia Initiative (GAI) launched its program on campus. GAI director, Professor Prasenjit Duara outlines the initiative’s mission in the above video.

GAI joined the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Inter-Asian Connections program as a Coordinating Partner and a hub for nodal research activities in March 2016.  The SSRC project has been active together with its coordinating partners in National University of Singapore, Hong Kong University, Yale University, Gottingen University and several other sponsoring partners across the world since 2008. It has held five international conferences and funded the research of over 50 junior scholars since then.  http://www.ssrc.org/programs/interasia-program/. By working closely with this global research network, it is hoped that Duke’s GAI, drawing on the resources of Duke and the Triangle area, will become one of its most important hubs in the US.

Global Asia Initiative website

 

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 2

Interethnic Intimacies: Production and Consumption

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S, LIT 415S, CULANTH 415S, AMI 415S, VMS 415S, ICS 415S

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ) Gateway course for the Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The class examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar version of this course.

 

Surviving Globalization: The Global South and the Development Imagination

with Professor Michaeline Crichlow

LATAMER 409, AAAS 409, SOCIOL 409, ICS 409, CULANTH 409

(CCI, EI, SS)

Global Change entails a multiplicity of environmental, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that create challenges for development. The Global South, a vital area of the world, has been entangled in this vortex of global change as both catalyst and conductor of an emergent globalizing modernity. The progress of globalization seems beset by multiple stressors, ranging from financial crises and global recession, to climate change, state and non-state conflicts, free ranging terrorist aggression, and global health scares. What are the odds then of surviving globalization? What role do our imaginations of development play in either creating crises or effectively responding to them?

 

Islam in the Americas

with Professor Mona Hassan

RELIGION 384S, HISTORY 351S, AAAS 274S, AMES 230S

(CCI, W, CZ, SS)

Explores how Muslim communities live and practice Islam in the American context. Examines diverse Muslim communities emerging from transatlantic exploration, trade in slaves, and migration as well as indigenous conversion. Discussion of religious and cultural identities of American Muslim peoples and consideration of questions of communal organization, religious authority, gender dynamics, youth culture, political and civic engagement, as well as American Muslim comedy and entertainment. This course examines the impact of 9/11 upon American Muslims, their responses to the tragedy, and Americans’ shifting perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

 

Events

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