Posts

Iraq & Syria: Arts and Revolutions – Fall 2017

Course number: AMES 222S

Course attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course description:

The course introduces the political and cultural background of the conflict and uprising in Iraq and Syria. Focusing on culture, arts, and literature especially after the Arab Spring 2011 this course uses movies, books, and guest speakers to broaden the understanding of the current war against terrorism and dictatorships.

Professor biography:

Abdul Sattar Jawad (known also as ‘Al-Mamouri’) is an Iraqi-born Professor of Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. He received a Ph.D in English Literature and Journalism, London’s City University (UK). He has been a Barksdale Fellow at the University of Mississippi Honors College; a Visiting Professor at the Department of English and American Language and Literature, Harvard University; and a scholar at the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies at Duke University. Before coming to Duke, he was Dean of College of Arts Mustansiriya University in Baghdad and edited the Baghdad Mirror. Apart from teaching Arabic and English Literature, he is an expert on the works of T. S. Eliot and those of William Shakespeare. He has translated Eliot’s “Waste Land” into Arabic. He is also an expert on Iraqi media and academia. Jawad has written 14 books on literature and media, and has edited several literary magazines and newspapers in English and Arabic.

 

 

Mexican Printmaker to Visit Duke, Durham to Celebrate Day of the Dead

by Jennifer Prather

Sergio Sánchez Santamaría, one of Mexico’s foremost printmakers, will visit Duke and the Durham community Oct. 21-29 to celebrate the Day of the Dead in North Carolina.

Sánchez Santamaría is a muralist, illustrator and printmaker who has taught and exhibited in the United States, Europe and Russia. The Frederic Jameson Gallery in the Friedl Building will display an exhibit of his works, “Printing Realities,” from Oct. 27-Dec. 9. An opening reception is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Sánchez Santamaría will teach at Duke, the Durham School of the Arts and Durham Technical Community College, and will make a limited edition linocut print for Supergraphic, a printmaking studio located in Durham’s Golden Belt complex. He will also create an original mural for the Mural Durham Festival at the Duke Arts Annex, from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22.

read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/10/mexican-printmaker-visit-duke-durham-celebrate-day-dead

 

Poetic Cinema

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S
Course codes: CCI, ALP, CZ
Course description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Instructor: Professor Satti Khanna

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

Fazil Say visits Duke

In February 2016, Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say visited Duke University as part of the Duke Performances’ artist-in-residence program. During his stay, Say preformed a sold out show, led a student chamber music intensive, met with the Turkish student association, and spoke on a public panel about music and culture in Turkey.

Erdağ Göknar, the director of the Middle East Studies Center, sat down with Say to discuss how Say’s work acts as a bridge between traditional Anatolian folk music and today’s modern Turkish compositions. Göknar and Say also discuss the idea of music as resistance.

Say’s residency was made possible, in part, with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with support from Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina (ATA-NC).

More about the artist:

Fazil Say’s Website

Fazil Say’s Facebook

 

Leonor Leal’s Contemporary Flamenco

On March 23rd, Leonor Leal gave a casual performance during a lecture on “The Art of Contemporary Flamenco” at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Wednesdays at the Center series. Leal was accompanied by guitarist, Jose Lois Rodriguez and vocalist/cajón player, Francisco “Yiyi” Orozco. All three of the artist have training in classical Flamenco, but now perform with more modern interpretation of the movement and music.

During the presentation, Leal touched on the international aspects of Flamenco which borrows motifs from Arab, African, and South American cultures. Leal playfully unpacked traditional Flamenco movements for the audience at the Franklin Center explaining the difference in postures from Tango and Flamenco.

Leal’s visit to Duke University was part of a 3-day residency supported by the Duke Dance Program, Spanish Studies, and the Program in Women’s Studies. Aside from her lecture at the Franklin Center, Leal also gave a public demonstration and held a master class in the Ark Dance Studio during the residency.

One Rwanda: Portraits of Contemporary Life

Bill Bamberger, Sewing class in the children's village of Kigarama

Bill Bamberger, Sewing class in the children’s village of Kigarama

Exhibiting:  March 7, 2016 – August 5, 2016


Exhibition Statement

On the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide, photographer Bill Bamberger traveled throughout the country to photograph the daily lives of the Rwandese people.

Like most documentarians visiting Rwanda at this historic time, Bamberger went there with plans to undertake a post-genocide project: to photograph children who had grown up parentless as a result of the genocide and were now raising families of their own.

But as Bamberger began to get to know the country and people, the focus of his project shifted. Over the course of three months, he journeyed by bus around Rwanda, meeting with Rwandese and international volunteers. During this time, he visited health clinics in Kigali’s poorest neighborhoods, schools in remote mountain villages, an orphanage on the banks of Lake Kivu, tea fields in the south, sugar cane fields in the north, national parks on the borders of the country and tennis clubs in Kigali’s most affluent neighborhoods.

Struck by the warmth, humanity, and collective resilience of the people as they sought to forge a new national identity, Bamberger stopped thinking about the Rwandese primarily as Hutus or Tutsis, or as perpetrators or survivors, as the international media most often portrayed them.

Instead, his photographs explore how the people of Rwanda are finding their way while faced with modern-day issues like healthcare, education and housing. We get a glimpse of how people are living side-by-side in ‘one Rwanda’, the government’s catchphrase for a country trying to put itself back together, 20 years after the genocide.

In the tradition of German photographer August Sander—whose landmark publication Face of Our Time depicted a diverse cross-section of society during the Weimer Republic—Bamberger’s portraits reveal the modern-day face of Rwanda and include: farmers, shopkeepers, taxi drivers, security guards, country club members, construction workers and orphaned children.

 

Biography

 

Bill Bamberger’s work explores large social issues of our time: the demise of the American factory, housing in America, and adolescents coming of age in an inner-city high school.  His first book, Closing: The Life and Death of an American Factory won the Mayflower Prize in Non-Fiction and was a semifinalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award.  His photographs have appeared in Aperture, Doubletake, Harper’s and the New York Times Magazine.  He has had one-person exhibitions at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution, the North Carolina Museum of Art and the National Building Museum.  A trademark of Bamberger’s photography is that it is first shown in the neighborhood where it was created, prior to its museum exhibition.

Supported by the Power – Lonnie Holley

Exhibiting in the John Hope Franklin Gallery from December 15, 2015 – February 26, 2016.

 

Lonnie Holley is the artist working today who can best eliminate the barrier between taught and untaught art. This collapse of dividers, not unlike racial ones, represents a declassification or deconstruction of a deeply troubling history in order to create a more communitarian future.

Holley is a peerless artist who we best label contemporary, not folk. His sense of contemporary is more closely aligned with current social and political events than most contemporary artists who seem to have only evolved their use of materials.

In Lonnie Holley: Supported by the Power, sculptures emerge from Alabama yards and Atlanta corners. Holley’s themes in his art and music run concurrent to contemporary actualities: post-Jim Crow race pathologies or a recycling of consumer goods towards a more sustainable future.   His story is a southern tale. The history of the South conjures the most American of stories: a story of oppression from tilled fields and small yards to urban corners of southern and northern cities.

Holley, when compared to an exemplary artist like Robert Rauschenberg, creates works which are more zen-like, less neurotic and contradictory and more future-predictive in terms of 1/ connecting to tradition 2/ a recycling of materials to make a more sustainable art 3/ creating works with fewer conservation problems as they are already time-rendered 4/ its connection to music 5/ creating a language of liberation 6/ the connection to nature and local specificities.

On the main wall we see four totemic, cruciform-like works which convey the African-American exigency of forced labor, suffering and the genesis of religious sanctuary.   On the end wall, Never to be Opened Again, made by Holley in post-Katrina New Orleans, depicts a local history in ruins, a result of the baneful mix of a corrupted nature and politics.   In the two remaining works, Supported by the Power and The Catholic Ladies’ Picture, Holley creates a personal history (auto-portraiture as empowerment) and a conceptual nod to art history (art objects as carriers of power). Supported by the Power, consisting solely of 7 sculptures, we can still grasp the sum power of Lonnie Holley’s work.

Special thanks are due to: the artist, Matt and William Arnett, Bradford Cox, Rodney and Nancy Gould, MA, Joan and Michael Salke, MA, Jason Doty, Giovanni Zanalda and Lauren Feilich.

Events

For Catalina’s Time

For Catalina's Time

For Catalina’s Time is a time-based series of photographs and footage by anthropologist and filmmaker Sandra Luz Barroso. The exhibit is complemented by ten pieces of graphic work made by Oaxacan artists titled ARTEZA (Trough). The exhibition is part of the process of completing the documentary ARTEMIO (2017) by Sandra Luz Barroso.

This project documents a decade of field work in the Costa Chica of Oaxaca, Mexico, where a number of communities of African descent live. Little research had been done in such communities and their social and community practices changed with the pressures of modernization and migration. Doña Catalina was an elderly woman who maintained traditional knowledge in the form of songs, stories of origin, culinary and medicinal practices. As ethnographer and visual anthropologist Sandra Luz Barroso spent several years doing field work in these communities where she developed a closer elationship with the subject of this exhibit.

“As an anthropologist I decided to research the history of their songs (son de artesa), transmitted via oral tradition by using audiovisual means. I met Catalina Noyola Bruno who told me stories of origin, of her people and of the son de artesa. I collected the stories and taped the songs without a final objective. Catalina passed away a few months after our last encounter, then I decided to focus on visual narratives to support the ethnographic studies of these communities.

For me, the Costa Chica is where I discovered that the sea has a name, a female name. I met a woman, Catalina, who danced, sang, and told the most beautiful sonnets I had ever heard. She spoke about walking around the world making what your heart dictates, and enjoying every day as the last one. She not only spoke, she embodied such words in her fragile figure of a woman that did not know how old it was. This far away land, in which the turtles go to nest, where a pond gives you light of many colors, where the sand sparkles at night, is magic.

I was fortunate to get to know Catalina in her last years, being the person who was there to hear her stories and memories drives me to share them with more people. Sharing my experiences with her, the spaces, and the communities one inhabits makes you whole.”

Sandra Luz Barroso

Left of Black with Uri McMilllan

Watch this week’s episode of Left of Black on the Franklin Center’s YouTube page: https://youtu.be/PiXO9EYwrP4 .

Left of Black host Dr. Mark Anthony Neal sits down with Dr. Uri McMillan to McMillan’s recent publication, “Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist art and performance”.

Dr. Neal teaches Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University.

Dr. McMillan is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles with joint appointments in the Departments of African-American Studies and Gender Studies and active affiliation with the Center for Perfromance Studies. Dr. McMillian’s work can be found at http://urimcmillan.com/ .

For Catalina’s Time – Reception

For Catalina’s Time is a time-based series of photographs and footage by anthropologist and filmmaker Sandra Luz Barroso. The exhibit is complemented by ten pieces of graphic work made by Oaxacan artists titled ARTEZA (Trough). The exhibition is part of the process of completing the documentary ARTEMIO (2017) by Sandra Luz Barroso.

This project documents a decade of field work in the Costa Chica of Oaxaca, Mexico, where a number of communities of African descent live. Little research had been done in such communities and their social and community practices changed with the pressures of modernization and migration. Doña Catalina was an elderly woman who maintained traditional knowledge in the form of songs, stories of origin, culinary and medicinal practices. As ethnographer and visual anthropologist Sandra Luz Barroso spent several years doing field work in these communities where she developed a closer elationship with the subject of this exhibit.

“As an anthropologist I decided to research the history of their songs (son de artesa), transmitted via oral tradition by using audiovisual means. I met Catalina Noyola Bruno who told me stories of origin, of her people and of the son de artesa. I collected the stories and taped the songs without a final objective. Catalina passed away a few months after our last encounter, then I decided to focus on visual narratives to support the ethnographic studies of these communities.

For me, the Costa Chica is where I discovered that the sea has a name, a female name. I met a woman, Catalina, who danced, sang, and told the most beautiful sonnets I had ever heard. She spoke about walking around the world making what your heart dictates, and enjoying every day as the last one. She not only spoke, she embodied such words in her fragile figure of a woman that did not know how old it was. This far away land, in which the turtles go to nest, where a pond gives you light of many colors, where the sand sparkles at night, is magic.

I was fortunate to get to know Catalina in her last years, being the person who was there to hear her stories and memories drives me to share them with more people. Sharing my experiences with her, the spaces, and the communities one inhabits makes you whole.”

Sandra Luz Barroso

Mexican Contemporary and Interdependent Art Scene, Biquini Wax EPS: The Temple of Sub-Critique Studies

Speakers: Paloma Contreras Lomas, Julio García Murillo, Nika Chilewich, Natalia de la Rosa, and Roselin Rodríguez

 

Biquini Wax EPS is an interdependent contemporary art space in Mexico City run by artists Paloma Contreras Lomas, Ramón Izaguirre, Israel Urmeer, Cristóbal Gracia, Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, and Eric Valencia, writers Gustavo Cruz, and Sandra Sánchez, art historian Natalia de la Rosa, and curators Roselin Rodriguez Espinosa Julio García Murillo, and Nika Chilewich, also directors of the Yacuziz, a collective of Sub-Critical Studies. The Yacuziz began with casual meetings geared towards the religious study of critical theory on contemporary art in Latin America – a meeting which occurred every fifteen days in Biquini Wax. We adopted the term “temple” to communicate the collective’s commitment to irrational beliefs and its supernatural or magical goals, in place of scientific or academic aspirations, borne from our understanding of knowledge as a poetic experience. We use the prefix “sub” to confront canonical Western traditions, and to assume the complexity of our economic and cultural relationship with the North, a gesture which emphasizes our affiliation with the colonial histories that unite Mexico, where the Yacuziz are based, with the rest of Latin America. By using this theoretical and conceptual platform, our understanding of criticism obtains an ‘other’ temporality, one with the capacity for radioactivity without the need for advanced weaponry, particularly the development and use of nuclear bombs as a post war tactic. Our subcritique is geometrical, realistic, archaeological, and analectic, a subapocalyptic nuclear warhead facing the sun; as Diego Rivera once said, “the Hbomb won’t affect the marxists”.

 

Biquini Wax EPS and Yacuziz are currently installed in a house, or vecindad, where half of its members lives with little separation between their domestic and work spaces. Their schedule is intense, with up to two or three events per week that include exhibitions and performances, as well as numerous reading groups and seminars, which is Biquini Wax EPS’ main focus. Biquini Wax EPS is a contemporary art sect, first established in order to create an original cultural space that would allow emergent artists to exhibit their art with refreshing peculiarity. From its conception, the sect’s research developed in complete communion with its work space or sanctuary –the lacking separation between the private and public spheres viewed as an expression of labor conditions in neoliberal times. Nowadays the group’s main objective is the production of art and critique generated in relationship to the space’s specific urban context. This is achieved through the collective’s unique organizational structure, and the commitment of its members to the political, social, and economic study of the Buenos Aires neighborhood where Biquini Wax EPS is currently located. This includes an expansion in the types of interventions the collective pursues from those mainly geared towards domestic space to actions directed at the greater social landscape. Biquini Wax EPS is indebted to previous independent projects in Mexico City, such as La Panadería or Temistocles 44, but the collective believes that the tradition of the artist-run space as a genre whose roots lie in the utopian notion of ‘integración plástica, or ‘plastic integration’ developed by Mexico’s modern artists, in particular the those belonging to the muralist movement.

 

Natalia de la Rosa is a Mexican art historian and curator. Her studies cover modern art and visual culture in Mexico; Mexican muralism and public art; cinema, architecture, and theory of the Avant-garde in Latin American. Her work poses fundamental questions about the interrelations between art, politics and economics in Latin American. Her interests include the need to rethink and highlight networks among artists and groups in countries like Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, and Colombia. De la Rosa published on David Alfaro Siqueiros, Mexican painting, cinema and poetry, and Pop art in Mexico. She was an associate curator at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico (2014-2016), where she coordinated and curated the exhibits: Cineplástica. Film on Art in Mexico (1960-1975), Paul Westheim: Sense and Form, and Juan Acha. Toward a New Artistic Problematic. Dr. De la Rosa collaborates with the collective “Los Yacuzis”, a group of artists, art critics, and journalists, recovering Latin American criticism, and producing editorial, curatorial and artistic projects. De la Rosa is a Posdoctoral Associate in the Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University. Currently she is working with Professor Esther Gabara, co-director at the Global Brazil Lab, prepararing the exhibition Pop América: Contesting Freedom, 1965-1975 for the Nasher Museum.

 

This event is presented by the John Hope Franklin Center, and Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. A light lunch will be served. Parking is available in nearby Trent Rd. and Erwin Rd. parking decks. The series provides 1 hour parking vouchers to guests.