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Visualizing the Muslim Gandhi

by Kelley Reardon

As part of the Wednesdays at the Center series, the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies welcomed Tim Dobe, Th.D. and Sumathi Ramaswamy, Ph.D. for a conversation on “Visualizing the Muslim Gandhi.”

 

The John Hope Franklin Center, Duke India Initiative, and Duke Islamic Center hosted the event, which discussed the connection of Gandhi to Islamic culture. Dr. Dobe is an Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Grinnell College and a current visiting fellow at the Duke Islamic Studies Center. Dr. Ramaswamy is a James B. Duke Professor of History and International Comparative Studies at Duke, Co-Director of Duke’s India Initiative, and President of the American Institute of Indian Studies.

 

 

Dr. Dobe discussed how there is often a focus on Gandhi’s Hinduism and western influence, but less attention on his ties to Muslim culture. In his earlier years, Gandhi was often depicted in art as “a man of the people,” and he was known to put immense effort into dressing appropriately to fit in with his surroundings. For instance, there are images of Gandhi in a suit while he was training to be a lawyer, and images of him in traditional Indian dress when he returned to India.

 

Furthermore, Dr. Dobe shared many works of Khwaja Hsan Nizami, who studied Gandhi and is known for his literary pieces. Nizami even predicted that Gandhi’s legacy would extent to the year 2050, when there would be a landscape of ethics and non-violence and nearly all Muslims would be vegetarian.

 

Dr. Ramaswamy shared artistic depictions of Gandhi later in life, when he would go without clothes and present himself nothing but a loin cloth. Artists depict this stage of Gandhi’s life in different ways—for instance, the modern Indian painter Maqbool Fida Husain did not shy away from painting Gandhi’s unclothed body. Meanwhile, Sayed Haidar Raza, who was also a modern Indian painter, rarely showed Gandhi in his paintings. Yet Raza’s work is still a reflection of his perspective on Gandhi.

 

As Ramaswamy explained, “there is no single way in which Muslim artists respond to Gandhi’s barely clothed body.” There was also the potential that artists were worried about allowing their faith to stand in the way of their art. However, the limitations that faith may have had on an artist’s work can be difficult to determine.

Introduction to African Studies – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HIST 129, POLSCI 108, ICS 110

Course Attributes: ALP, CCI, CZ

Course Description:

This course offers a broad introduction to the archaeology, history, politics, language, culture, aesthetics, and religion of African peoples. With the help of a variety of sources—scholarly works by historians, anthropologists, literary figures, filmmakers, and journalist—we will explore the ways in which Africans, across a massive and incredibly diverse continent, have responded to and engaged with the slave trade, colonial overrule, transnational markets, and to other more recent experiences and challenges after political independence.

Faculty Biographies:

Samuel Fury DalySamuel Fury Childs Daly specializes in the history of twentieth-century Africa. His research bridges West and East Africa, and it combines legal, military, and social historical approaches to the study of the past. His current project considers the history of the Biafra War (1967-1970). This book manuscript entitled Sworn on the Gun: Law and Crime in the Nigerian Civil War draws a connection between the crisis conditions of the war and the forms of crime that came to be associated with Nigeria in its wake. Using an original body of legal records from the secessionist Republic of Biafra, it traces how technologies, survival practices, and moral ideologies that emerged in the context of the fighting shaped the practice and perception of crime after Biafra’s defeat. Connecting the violence of the battlefield to violent crime, it provides a new perspective on the discursive relationship between law and disorder in the African postcolony. His other areas of interest include customary law in the British Empire, the history of vigilantism in Tanzania, and the methodologies of postcolonial African history.
 
Anne-Maria MakhuluAnne-Maria Makhulu is an Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies and Core Faculty in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, neoliberalism, the anthropology of finance and corporations, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature of South Africa. Makhulu is co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010) and the author of Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home (2015). She is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism(2010), author of articles in Anthropological Quarterly and PMLA, special issue guest editor for South Atlantic Quarterly (115(1)) and special theme section guest editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (36(2)). A new project, South Africa After the Rainbow (in preparation), examines the relationship between race and mobility in postapartheid South Africa.

S19_AAAS_103

Poetic Cinema – Spring 2019

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S

Course Attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course Description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with an emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Satti KhannaFaculty Biography:

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

 

 

Poetic Cinema

inTransit Workshop looks at Art and Migration around Europe

On February 1st, 2018, academics and artists from around the globe gathered at Duke University for the inTransit: Arts & Migration around Europe workshop. The workshop focused on two themes, “Reversible Patterns: Historical and Contemporary Views from Spain, Northern African and the Middle East” and “Northwards across the Grain of Time: France, Flanders and the Lowlands, West Africa”.

James Amelang, Ph.D. and E. Michael Gerli, Ph.D. presented on the 16th-century expulsion of the Moriscos from Spain. In the videos below, both professors comment on how Spanish history can plan a role in the migration crisis happening in Spain today. Amelang is Professor of History in the Department of Early Modern History at the Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain. His research focuses on early modern urban social history with a specialization on Barcelona. Gerli is Common Wealth Professor of Spanish at the University of Virginia. Gerli’s research explores medieval and renaissance literature and linguistics.

The inTransit research group strives to bridge ideological divides and contribute to current debates on migration in major regions of the globe where Romance languages are spoken.

 

 

 

Wednesdays at the Center – Spring 2018 Schedule

Wednesdays at the Center (W@TC) is a topical weekly series in which scholars, artists, journalists, and others speak informally about their work in conversation with the audience. This semester the John Hope Franklin Center is proud to collaborate with partners across Duke and throughout the larger academic community to present a discipline diverse series.

Join us on Wednesdays throughout the semester from 12:00pm – 1:00pm in the Franklin Center’s Ahmadiah Family Conference Hall, room 240. A light lunch is served at each event.

Born Again Black: Tracing Diaspora and Nation through the Diasporic A.M.E. Church

(CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER)

A lecture with Christina C. Davidson, Ph.D., History Department, Duke University

January 17, 2018, 12:00pm -1:00pm

Mental Health in Haiti: Exploring culture and language to improve care

A lecture with Bonnie Kaiser, Ph.D., Duke Global Health Institute

January 24, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Tainan, City Pluriferent

A lecture with David Liu, Ph.D., Religious Studies Department, Duke University

January 31, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Blackness Unmoored: Relational Ethics and Aesthetics in Stromae’s “Formidable”

A lecture with Daphne Lamothe, Ph.D., Humanities Writ Large, Duke University

February 7, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Duke Undergraduate Working Group on MENA

A panel of Duke students from the Duke Undergraduate Working Group in MENA 

February 14, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

American Qur’an

A lecture with Sandow Birk, visual artist

February 21, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Food Insecurity on College Campuses and Beyond

A panel discussion with Rochelle Newton, Ed.D

February 28, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Africa’s ‘Scramble for Europe’

A lecture with Stephen W. Smith, Ph.D., African and African American Studies, Duke University

March 7, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Everyday Conversions: Islam, Domestic Work & South Asian Migrant Women in Kuwait

A lecture with Attiya Ahmad, Ph.D., Departments of Anthropology and International Affairs, George Washington University

March 21, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Blood Letters: The Untold Story of Lin Zhao, a Martyr in Mao’s China

A lecture with Xi Lian, D.A., Duke Divinity School

March 28, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Virtual Reality in the Arabic Classroom at Duke

A panel discussion with Seth Anderson, Chip Bobbert, Mich Donovan, Elizabeth Evans, Maha Houssami, Thatcher Owen, and Leah Rothfeld

April 4, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Building an International Archive in the Jim Crow South: Arturo Schomburg at Fisk University

A lecture with Vanessa Valdés, Ph.D., The City College of New York and discussant, Mark Anthony Neal, Ph.D., Duke University

April 11, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Diverse Perspectives: Graduate Working Groups on Global Issues

A panel presentation from the 2017-2018 Graduate Working Groups on Global Issues

April 18, 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm

Iraq & Syria: Arts and Revolutions – Fall 2017

Course number: AMES 222S

Course attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course description:

The course introduces the political and cultural background of the conflict and uprising in Iraq and Syria. Focusing on culture, arts, and literature especially after the Arab Spring 2011 this course uses movies, books, and guest speakers to broaden the understanding of the current war against terrorism and dictatorships.

Professor biography:

Abdul Sattar Jawad (known also as ‘Al-Mamouri’) is an Iraqi-born Professor of Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. He received a Ph.D in English Literature and Journalism, London’s City University (UK). He has been a Barksdale Fellow at the University of Mississippi Honors College; a Visiting Professor at the Department of English and American Language and Literature, Harvard University; and a scholar at the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies at Duke University. Before coming to Duke, he was Dean of College of Arts Mustansiriya University in Baghdad and edited the Baghdad Mirror. Apart from teaching Arabic and English Literature, he is an expert on the works of T. S. Eliot and those of William Shakespeare. He has translated Eliot’s “Waste Land” into Arabic. He is also an expert on Iraqi media and academia. Jawad has written 14 books on literature and media, and has edited several literary magazines and newspapers in English and Arabic.

 

 

Mexican Printmaker to Visit Duke, Durham to Celebrate Day of the Dead

by Jennifer Prather

Sergio Sánchez Santamaría, one of Mexico’s foremost printmakers, will visit Duke and the Durham community Oct. 21-29 to celebrate the Day of the Dead in North Carolina.

Sánchez Santamaría is a muralist, illustrator and printmaker who has taught and exhibited in the United States, Europe and Russia. The Frederic Jameson Gallery in the Friedl Building will display an exhibit of his works, “Printing Realities,” from Oct. 27-Dec. 9. An opening reception is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Sánchez Santamaría will teach at Duke, the Durham School of the Arts and Durham Technical Community College, and will make a limited edition linocut print for Supergraphic, a printmaking studio located in Durham’s Golden Belt complex. He will also create an original mural for the Mural Durham Festival at the Duke Arts Annex, from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22.

read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/10/mexican-printmaker-visit-duke-durham-celebrate-day-dead

 

Poetic Cinema

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S
Course codes: CCI, ALP, CZ
Course description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Instructor: Professor Satti Khanna

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

Fazil Say visits Duke

In February 2016, Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say visited Duke University as part of the Duke Performances’ artist-in-residence program. During his stay, Say preformed a sold out show, led a student chamber music intensive, met with the Turkish student association, and spoke on a public panel about music and culture in Turkey.

Erdağ Göknar, the director of the Middle East Studies Center, sat down with Say to discuss how Say’s work acts as a bridge between traditional Anatolian folk music and today’s modern Turkish compositions. Göknar and Say also discuss the idea of music as resistance.

Say’s residency was made possible, in part, with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with support from Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina (ATA-NC).

More about the artist:

Fazil Say’s Website

Fazil Say’s Facebook

 

Leonor Leal’s Contemporary Flamenco

On March 23rd, Leonor Leal gave a casual performance during a lecture on “The Art of Contemporary Flamenco” at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Wednesdays at the Center series. Leal was accompanied by guitarist, Jose Lois Rodriguez and vocalist/cajón player, Francisco “Yiyi” Orozco. All three of the artist have training in classical Flamenco, but now perform with more modern interpretation of the movement and music.

During the presentation, Leal touched on the international aspects of Flamenco which borrows motifs from Arab, African, and South American cultures. Leal playfully unpacked traditional Flamenco movements for the audience at the Franklin Center explaining the difference in postures from Tango and Flamenco.

Leal’s visit to Duke University was part of a 3-day residency supported by the Duke Dance Program, Spanish Studies, and the Program in Women’s Studies. Aside from her lecture at the Franklin Center, Leal also gave a public demonstration and held a master class in the Ark Dance Studio during the residency.

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