Latin American Art Workshop

Latin American Art: Workshop for Educators

NEW DATE (rescheduled due to weather)

Saturday, February 27, 2016

9:00 am – 4:00 pm

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005

301 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC

This workshop is free and open to educators of all grades and levels. Spaces are available for 25 people on a first come, first served basis. Registration is required. Lunch will be provided.

This workshop will provide educators with a day of learning, reflection and curriculum development about various aspects of Latin American art. Participants will receive a curriculum and resource guide with teaching materials they can use.
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Latin American Art Workshop Flyer
Questions? Contact Outreach Program Coordinator Emily Chávez at emily.chavez@duke.edu.
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.https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wFu6Ahg0gc4z4gLFDb84JH1JEeL5rk72QAnqrZhfcL0/edit?us
 Resource Links
Links for teaching about Afro-Latin American Art
Links for teaching about Indigenous Latin American Art
Session and Presenter Information
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Session 1 – “On Art and Cannibalism: Introduction to Latin American Contemporary Art and Culture”
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Presenter: Miguel Rojas-Sotelo
By underlining the complex context in which histories of the region had been built, written and shared, this presentation presents -in an illustrated fashion- an approximation to the visual cultures of the region. By exploring the relationships that the region has with the West/North dominant culture, from Christopher Columbus to today; and the forces of dependence, in cultural, economic, and ideological dimensions the presentation would attempt to stage the major topics present in the cultural landscape of the Americas.

The topics that would be covered are: Identity and Identification (Creolization and hybridization versus mestizaje); Race, Gender, the Savage and the Cannibal (repression, annihilation, and assimilation); Barbarism Versus Civilization (the “lettered City” and beyond the “lettered City”); Counter-Historical Discourses (the other and the re-writing of history – evolution, in-volution, revolution); Visual Arts and Nation Building (the Art Salon, the art school, cultural institutions and policy, and the art market); Third world Culture and the so-called Global SouthDiasporas and Cultural Activism(migration, de-colonization and border-cultures; The POST-NATIONAL (Spanglish,  Pachuco, and latinidad – transculturación and acculturation.)

By showing a selection of art pieces in relationship with such topics, the presentation answers to a particular attitude regarding the institutionalized panorama of the Latin American art today. By insisting in the re-signification of visual practices through collapsing history, culture, language, and life these art pieces and artist acknowledge their own impotence regarding the status quo. Through their use of conceptual games (irony and sarcasm) and the development of strategies made by simple assumptions and precarious materials they attempt to retrieve art from its ultra-codified status and re-insert it, the into the social and public sphere.

Miguel Rojas-Sotelo was born in Bogotá, Colombia. He is an art historian, visual artist, media activist, scholar, and curator. He holds a Doctorate (PhD) in Visual Studies, Contemporary Art, and Cultural Theory (U. Pittsburgh, 2009), M.A in Modern and Contemporary Art (U. Pittsburgh, 2004), MFA on Visual Arts (U. de los Andes, 1995), and BA in Art  (sub-major in History and Philosophy).
Sotelo worked as visual arts director of the Ministry of Culture of Colombia (1995-2001), building cultural policy for the visual arts in his country, and independently as artist, curator, and critic ever since. His areas of interest are: decolonial aesthetics, intercultural visualities, subaltern studies, the global south, contemporary visual circuits, culture and power, Latin American visual production, cultural politics and subjectivity, performance and film studies. He currently works and teaches at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Duke University where he is the Special Events Coordinator and the Director of the NC Latin American Film and New Media Festival.
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Session 2 – “Integrating Latin American Art into the Classroom”
Presenter: Lisandra Estevez
This session focuses on how teachers and instructors can incorporate Latin American art and history into their K-12 and community college classes.  It will provide a general overview of educational materials and resources relevant to the rich and diverse art, history, and geography of Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean.  Part of this session’s discussion will address a racially and ethnically diverse group of artists as well as the many women who made extraordinary contributions to the region’s visual culture.  The presentation of hands-on, interactive activities will support high-touch, high-impact practices so that educators can creatively implement this material in their curricula.
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Dr. Lisandra Estevez is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Art and Visual Studies at Winston-Salem State University.  She holds her PhD in Art History from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.  Her teaching areas and research interests include Latin American and Spanish art (1500 to present).  She was recently a Visiting Scholar at Institute of the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill and the recipient of a curriculum grant through the Consortium of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University to underwrite a course on modern and contemporary women artists in Latin America.
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Session 3 – “Painting Visions: Making Art Together”
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Presenter: Cornelio Campos
In this session, Mr. Campos will discuss the methods he uses in his work and the themes that he highlights.  Then, guided by Mr. Campos, the participants will create a painting that allows them to explore concepts related to identity and community.
*Materials will be provided, but participants should bring appropriate clothing for painting.
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Cornelio Campos is a Mexican-born artist who now resides in the U.S. He was born in 1971 and moved to the U.S in 1989. He has always been interested in art; as a child, he was interested in comic books, and this style comes out in his work sometimes. Campos shares emotions and explores contemporary political issues, such as immigration, the U.S.-Mexico border and cultural identity. Some of his other works highlight earlier experiences of the history and culture of his indigenous roots using a folkloric art style. These paintings represent everyday scenes of Mexican life, such as selling handmade crafts, connecting with family and celebrating religious traditions. Through vibrant colors and layer-upon-layer of symbolism, the work of Cornelio Campos challenges viewers to contemplate the American dreams of many, including their own.
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Copyright 2018 | The Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University