2013 College Educators Research Fellows

2013 College Educators Research Fellows

Kathryn Bove, Spanish, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College
Project Title: “Restructure, Re-envision, and Reignite: Bringing new life to an online culture course”

Kate Bove is a full-time Spanish instructor at AB Tech, teaching Spanish and Spanish culture. She has a master´s degree in Spanish Linguistics, and she is excited about exploring more resources for online learning.  Her project will look at five countries within Latin America, comparing and contrasting themes such as gender, ethnicity, violence, race, religion, and popular culture.  The materials that she gathers will be used as a course icebreaker,  periodically throughout the semester, and as the final exam for the Spanish Culture and Civilization course.

 

 

John Davis, PhD, Psychology, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College
Project Title: “Psychology of Latin Americans”

Dr. John Davis has been an instructor of Psychology at AB Tech in Asheville, NC for 7 years. Prior to that he has been a linguist (Air Force) and then a mangement consultant. He holds a Ph.D from Georgia State University and an N.D. from Bastyr University in Washington. His interest in Latin America arises from his focus on languages and globalization.

 

Carol L. Schmid, PhD, Sociology, Guilford Technical Community College
Project Title: “Affirmative Action and Higher Education in Brazil and the United States: A View from the Other America”

Carol L. Schmid is Professor of Sociology at Guilford Technical Community College. She is the author of Conflict and Consensus in Switzerland (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981) and The Politics of Language (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001), which examines how political and structural tensions arise to divide political communities along language lines. She has also published many articles on the intersection of language, ethnic relations and law. Her current research is on Affirmative Action in Brazil and the United States.

Copyright 2019 | The Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University