S19_AAAS_103_Sq

Introduction to African Studies – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HIST 129, POLSCI 108, ICS 110

Course Attributes: ALP, CCI, CZ

Course Description:

This course offers a broad introduction to the archaeology, history, politics, language, culture, aesthetics, and religion of African peoples. With the help of a variety of sources—scholarly works by historians, anthropologists, literary figures, filmmakers, and journalist—we will explore the ways in which Africans, across a massive and incredibly diverse continent, have responded to and engaged with the slave trade, colonial overrule, transnational markets, and to other more recent experiences and challenges after political independence.

Faculty Biographies:

Samuel Fury DalySamuel Fury Childs Daly specializes in the history of twentieth-century Africa. His research bridges West and East Africa, and it combines legal, military, and social historical approaches to the study of the past. His current project considers the history of the Biafra War (1967-1970). This book manuscript entitled Sworn on the Gun: Law and Crime in the Nigerian Civil War draws a connection between the crisis conditions of the war and the forms of crime that came to be associated with Nigeria in its wake. Using an original body of legal records from the secessionist Republic of Biafra, it traces how technologies, survival practices, and moral ideologies that emerged in the context of the fighting shaped the practice and perception of crime after Biafra’s defeat. Connecting the violence of the battlefield to violent crime, it provides a new perspective on the discursive relationship between law and disorder in the African postcolony. His other areas of interest include customary law in the British Empire, the history of vigilantism in Tanzania, and the methodologies of postcolonial African history.
 
Anne-Maria MakhuluAnne-Maria Makhulu is an Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies and Core Faculty in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, neoliberalism, the anthropology of finance and corporations, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature of South Africa. Makhulu is co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010) and the author of Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home (2015). She is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism(2010), author of articles in Anthropological Quarterly and PMLA, special issue guest editor for South Atlantic Quarterly (115(1)) and special theme section guest editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (36(2)). A new project, South Africa After the Rainbow (in preparation), examines the relationship between race and mobility in postapartheid South Africa.

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