Global Asia Initiative

In the spring of 2016, Duke University’s Global Asia Initiative (GAI) launched its program on campus. GAI director, Professor Prasenjit Duara outlines the initiative’s mission in the above video.

GAI joined the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Inter-Asian Connections program as a Coordinating Partner and a hub for nodal research activities in March 2016.  The SSRC project has been active together with its coordinating partners in National University of Singapore, Hong Kong University, Yale University, Gottingen University and several other sponsoring partners across the world since 2008. It has held five international conferences and funded the research of over 50 junior scholars since then.  http://www.ssrc.org/programs/interasia-program/. By working closely with this global research network, it is hoped that Duke’s GAI, drawing on the resources of Duke and the Triangle area, will become one of its most important hubs in the US.

Global Asia Initiative website

 

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 3

JAPANESE CINEMA
with Professor Takushi Odagiri

(CCI, ALP, CZ) 

AMES 261, LIT 213, AMI 255, VMS 232

This course is an introduction to the history of Japanese cinema.  Focusing on the issues of relations between the tradition-modernity or Japan-West in the development of Japanese cinema, the influence of Japanese films on the theory and practice of cinema abroad, and the ways in which cinema has served as a reflection of and an active agent in the transformation of Japanese society this course provides a broad overview of Japanese cinema.

 

GATEWAY SEMINAR: ASIA IN GLOBAL HISTORY
with Professor Prasenjit Duara

(CCI, CZ, SS)

HISTORY 162S

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN EASTERN EUROPE AND ASIA
with Professor Mustafa Tuna

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

SES 375S, HISTORY 333S, POLSCI 359S, PUBPOL 282S

This course combines perspectives of political sociology and history questioning the respective roles of state policies and social movements in transforming societies. The course explores concepts such as social engineering, violence, revolution, totalitarianism, social movements, non-violent resistance, collective action and many others. This course reviews historically-informed case studies of: colonialism/anti-colonial movements (passive resistance and nationalism) in India; revolutionary communism, socialist reconstruction of society, everyday resistance and collective dissent in the Soviet Bloc; authoritarian capitalism and dissent in the form of environmentalist and anti-corruption movements in post-Maoist China.

Learn a Less Commonly Studied Language

Duke University offers several less commonly studied languages: Haitian Creole, Hebrew, K’iche’ Maya, and Tibetan. These languages all carry the FL code and can be applied towards Duke’s foreign languages requirement.

Haitian Creole Studies at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • CREOLE 101 & 701 – Elementary Creole I

An introduction to the essential elements of Haitian Creole or Kreyòl language and aspects of Haitian culture. The first of the two-semester sequence of elementary Haitian Creole or Kreyòl, the course provides practice in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the language, culturally contextualized through units on health care, Haitian women¿s rights issues, and unpaid child servants (restavèk). Students will acquire enough vocabulary and idioms to be able to interact with Haitians. Taught in Haitian Creole. No pre-requisite

  • CREOLE 203 & 703 – Intermediate Creole I

First semester of intermediate Haitian Creole or Kreyol. This course moves beyond survival skills in Creole to more complex social interactions and expressions of analysis and opinion. Intermediate skills in understanding, speaking, writing, reading will be contextualized within a broad range of issues such as rural life in Haiti, religion, frenchified Creole vs popular Creole, through texts, poems, and excerpts taken from novels in Haitian Creole. Students will learn to carefully follow contemporary events and debates in Haitian culture using internet resources in Creole. Pre-requisite: Creole 102 or equivalent. Taught in Haitian Creole.

Why Study Haitian Creole?

  • Haitian Creole is a Francophone language with influences from Portuguese, Spanish, and West African Languages.
  • Haitian Creole is one of the official languages of Haiti.
  • Haitian Creole is spoken by over world, but mainly in the Caribbean.
  • Duke University Haitian Creole lecturer Jacques Pierre develops online video teaching tools available here.

Duke Opportunities:

K’iche’ Maya at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • KICHE 101 & 703 – Elementary K’iche’ Maya I

Introduction to essential elements of K’iche’ Maya language and aspects of Maya culture. K’iche’ Maya, a language spoken by about a million people in the western Highlands of Guatemala, is one of the major indigenous languages in the Americas. Emphasis on active language production to develop basic conversational skills for everyday interactions. No pre-requisite.

  • KICHE 203 & 703 – Intermediate K’iche’ Maya I

Develops greater competencies in writing in K’iche’ and translation to/from K’iche’. Covers more advanced grammar (verb modalities) and broader range of scripts (colonial vs. modern orthography). Research conducted in K’iche’ using the Oral History archive at the University of New Mexico. Students select a story from the online archive, listen to audio, correct transcription, rewrite it in modern orthography and translate it into contemporary English to present to classmates. Prerequisite: K’iche’ Maya 102 or equivalent.

Why study K’iche’ Maya?

  • K’iche’ is the most spoken indigenous language of the Mayan people living in the highlands of Central America, Guatemala, and El Salvador.
  • K’iche’ is the language of the Popol Wuj, the sacred book of the Maya, which dates to the 16th century.
  • Course taught “live” by Vanderbilt University Professor Mareike Sattle; students participate through videoconference / telepresence classrooms.

Duke Opportunities:

Hebrew Language at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • HEBREW 101 – Elementary Modern Hebrew

This course assumes that students enter with either little or no background in the language. Typically, students begin the course without any prior study or, at most, some knowledge from after-school Hebrew programs. We begin with a review of the Hebrew aleph-bet, and quickly move to develop students’ skills in conversation, reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Grammar is taught based on communicative needs. By the end of the first semester, students will be able to conjugate active verbs in the present tense, and will be introduced to active past-tense constructions; recognize and use simple syntactic structures; read and write texts with non-compound sentences. This course is taught in the fall semester only.

  • HEBREW 203 – Intermediate Modern Hebrew

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 002. Based on the skills learned during the first year of study, this course continues with a similar method, developing skills in all areas of language acquisition. Verb study will be taught according to the binyanim, and in general, grammar study will be more structured. Conversation will continue to be emphasized with stress on creating flexibility and elasticity in students’ skills. Formal presentations will be required, and students will begin to write texts requiring critical thought. Toward the end of the semester, standard Hebrew texts drawn from literary sources will be read, analyzed, and discussed in class. By the end of Hebrew 063, students will have completed a introduction to the grammar and basic syntactic structures of modern Hebrew. They will also be able to converse on a number of topics and to discuss simple critical ideas. This course is taught in the fall semester only.

  • HEBREW 391 – Independent Study

Why Study Hebrew?

  • Hebrew is the language of the Jewish Bible (the Christian “Old Testament”).
  • Hebrew is unique: a language with a 3,000 year history.
  • Hebrew is the primary language of Israel, one of the world’s fastest-growing high-tech economies and a country of constant prominence and importance on the world stage.
  • Once you know Hebrew, whole libraries of written treasures, ancient and modern, open up to you, as well as one of the most cutting-edge cinema and theater cultures in our modern world.
  • If you are interested in research on the Middle East or in working there, a knowledge of Hebrew is invaluable.

Duke Opportunities:

Tibetan Language at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • TIBETAN 101 & 701 – Elementary Tibetan I

Introductory Tibetan language course for students who have little to no knowledge of Tibetan. Development of speaking, listening, reading, writing skills through Tibetan concepts, grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan. Topics include situations of everyday life (e.g. greetings, introductions, family, habits/hobbies, making appointments, food, visiting friends, weather, shopping, etc.) as well as aspects of Tibetan people and culture (e.g. songs, short stories, etc.).

  • TIBETAN 203 & 703 – Intermediate Tibetan I

Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisite: TIBETAN 102 Elementary Tibetan II or equivalent.

Why study Tibetan?

  • Tibetan is the language of a vast region at the heart of Asia and is used in China, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, India, Russia, and Mongolia.
  • Tibetan is the language of the historical Tibet, home to Tibetan Buddhism, the source of one of the world’s richest contemplative traditions.
  • Course taught “live” by University of Virginia instructor Tsetan Chonjore; students participate through videoconference / telepresence classrooms.

Duke Opportunities:

 

 

Testing your Geographical Knowledge

Join Duke University lecturer Jacques Pierre and Haitian Creole students from many universities for a test of your geographical knowledge in this fifth set of riddles/memonèt.

Watch the first set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/_MzZq_WTW8Q

Watch the second set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/t2KuPgtkV48

Watch the third set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/hYIN2STg7qI

Watch the fourth set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/e6P55rhbLHA

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 2

Interethnic Intimacies: Production and Consumption

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S, LIT 415S, CULANTH 415S, AMI 415S, VMS 415S, ICS 415S

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ) Gateway course for the Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The class examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar version of this course.

 

Surviving Globalization: The Global South and the Development Imagination

with Professor Michaeline Crichlow

LATAMER 409, AAAS 409, SOCIOL 409, ICS 409, CULANTH 409

(CCI, EI, SS)

Global Change entails a multiplicity of environmental, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that create challenges for development. The Global South, a vital area of the world, has been entangled in this vortex of global change as both catalyst and conductor of an emergent globalizing modernity. The progress of globalization seems beset by multiple stressors, ranging from financial crises and global recession, to climate change, state and non-state conflicts, free ranging terrorist aggression, and global health scares. What are the odds then of surviving globalization? What role do our imaginations of development play in either creating crises or effectively responding to them?

 

Islam in the Americas

with Professor Mona Hassan

RELIGION 384S, HISTORY 351S, AAAS 274S, AMES 230S

(CCI, W, CZ, SS)

Explores how Muslim communities live and practice Islam in the American context. Examines diverse Muslim communities emerging from transatlantic exploration, trade in slaves, and migration as well as indigenous conversion. Discussion of religious and cultural identities of American Muslim peoples and consideration of questions of communal organization, religious authority, gender dynamics, youth culture, political and civic engagement, as well as American Muslim comedy and entertainment. This course examines the impact of 9/11 upon American Muslims, their responses to the tragedy, and Americans’ shifting perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

 

Summer 2016 HR and Business Office Updates

Updates written by Charlotte Fleming.

HR Hiring Process for Staff

  1. Open requisition in I-Forms. Students, Research Associates, and Post Doc positions are expedited.
    1. All other positions need a Vacancy Management Form (VMF), current job description, and organization chart submitted to Giovanni and Charlotte for review.
    2. After review and approval, Jaymes will open requisition in I-Forms.
    3. Candidate resumes/applications are downloaded and forwarded to Interview Committee. Charlotte should always be part of the Interview Committee or at least brought into the process after the final candidate is selected and BEFORE any offer is extended.
  2. Finalists resumes sent to Charlotte and Giovanni for review. Once final candidate selected, draft of offer letter needs reviewing before offer or start date extended.
  3. Charlotte will submit copy of the resume and draft offer letter to Kathy Sparrow for salary assessment and approval.
  4. Once approved (sometimes may require provostial assessment), center notified to proceed.
  5. Jaymes Walker, payroll rep, will onboard and get candidate set up in the payroll system.

 

END OF FISCAL YEAR UPDATE/DEADLINES

Payroll Deadlines

Monthly:  June 2016 monthly payroll deadline is Monday, June 6th.  This includes summer supplemental payments.  Please refer to email memo of May 12, 2016.

Noncompensatory: June 2016 payroll deadline is Friday, June 10, 2016 by end of day.

 

Employee Travel and Reimbursement (ET&R) Deadlines

Check Requests – 5:00pm on Thursday, June 30, 2016.  Requests must be submitted in the Universal Work List by this date and time.

Vendor Invoices – 5:00pm on Thursday, June 30, 2016.  Invoices must be received by your centers and submitted for processing in our office by this date and time.

 

Corporate Card Deadline(s)

Corporate Card Transactions

  • All expense reports received in ET&R by the end of the day on Wednesday, June 15, 2016 will be processed in fiscal year 2016.
  • Expense reports for April 1 – May 15, 2016 transactions must be submitted in Duke@Work by the end of day June 10, 2016.
    • All outstanding corporate card transactions with a Settlement Date (Bank of America posting date) prior to May 15, 2016 will be charged to one of the general ledger (g/l) accounts described below depending on the status of the transaction at the time of the posting.
    • 695685 – Unapproved Corporate Card Transactions; Assigned corporate card expenses without complete approval.
    • 695695 – Unassigned Corporate Card Transactions; Unassigned corporate card expenses with no action taken.

Any expenses charged or written off to these g/l accounts will likely result in automatic Pcard suspension for 90 days.  This has not formally been announced yet, but is the plan of action that the Provost Office has decided to take.

Fall 2016 Feature Courses, part 1

QUEER CHINA

with Professor Carlos Rojas

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 439, AMI 439, CULANTH 439, LIT 439, VMS 439, WOMENST 439

This course examines queer discourse, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. This course focuses on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but also considers a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials.

 

WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 471, AMI 256, CULANTH 255, LIT 212, VMS 234

The WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA broadly defines national, generic, and theoretical boundaries, beyond conventional auteur, genre, one-way influence, and national cinema theories. This course also examines cinematic texts in local, regional, and global contexts and intersections. This course covers variable topics based in theoretical and political discourses on gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, global flows of people and cultures, and popular and “high” culture crossovers, traditional co-productions, remakes, translations and retellings. Previous knowledge of Korean language and culture is not required.

 

MIDDLE EAST AND LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Ellen McLarney 

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 375S, LATAMER 375S
This course will look at how Middle Eastern identities blend with Latin American ones, through migration, institutions, popular media, transnational political ideologies (Marxist, leftist, socialist, populist, nationalist, religious, or feminist), as well as through conversions and proselytizing. Solidarities across the Global South central to Latin American projects to “decolonize the mind,” to mutually inspired “liberation theologies,”, and to new kinds of non-Western feminisms will be covered. This course explores the creative conjuncture of Middle Eastern and Latin American politics and cultures, through immigration and assimilation, institution building, political activism, media production, feminism, and conversion.

CONTEMPORARY TURKISH COMPOSITION AND READINGS

with Professor Erdağ Göknar

(CCI, FL) Prerequisite – Turkish 70

Advanced grammar and syntax with intense composition component. Analytical readings in the original. Prerequisite: Turkish 70 or equivalent.

 

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Jocelyn Olcott


(CCI, CZ) – Gateway for Undergraduate Latin American and Caribbean Studies Certificate

LATAMER 230, HISTORY 330, ICS 327

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the peoples, cultures, and burning issues of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a required course for students seeking the certificate in Latin American Studies.

 

 

Leonor Leal’s Contemporary Flamenco

On March 23rd, Leonor Leal gave a casual performance during a lecture on “The Art of Contemporary Flamenco” at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Wednesdays at the Center series. Leal was accompanied by guitarist, Jose Lois Rodriguez and vocalist/cajón player, Francisco “Yiyi” Orozco. All three of the artist have training in classical Flamenco, but now perform with more modern interpretation of the movement and music.

During the presentation, Leal touched on the international aspects of Flamenco which borrows motifs from Arab, African, and South American cultures. Leal playfully unpacked traditional Flamenco movements for the audience at the Franklin Center explaining the difference in postures from Tango and Flamenco.

Leal’s visit to Duke University was part of a 3-day residency supported by the Duke Dance Program, Spanish Studies, and the Program in Women’s Studies. Aside from her lecture at the Franklin Center, Leal also gave a public demonstration and held a master class in the Ark Dance Studio during the residency.