Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 4

CHINA AND THE SILK ROAD

with Professor Sucheta Mazumdar

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 239, HISTORY 323

This course introduces the rich and diverse world of trade, religions, and cultures that connected the two ends of the Eurasian world. The course starts with survey of Han and Roman trade contacts, and Chinese connections with India via Buddhism, focusing on 7th-15 centuries CE. Covers themes such as the coming of Islam and Nestorian Christians to China, travelers to China during the vast Mongol Empire including Marco Polo, and voyages of the Chinese admiral Zheng He to Africa at the beginning of the 15th century which opened up the maritime Silk Roads.

 

INDIAN CIVILIZATION

with Professor John (Rich) Richardson Freeman
(CCI, EI, W, CZ, SS)
 HISTORY 219, CULANTH 215, AMES 257
Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials.

 

AFRICAN CITIES

with Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu
(CCI, SS)
AAAS 640S, CULANTH 562S
If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life–the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent–from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town–and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies.

Duke’s Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

Duke University’s certificate programs offer you the opportunity to diversify your degree by studying a topic or theme that spans multiple departments and disciplines. The Asian Pacific Studies Institute’s (APSI) Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate strives to provide you with:

  • A broad introduction to East Asian Studies
  • An understanding of differing disciplinary approaches to East Asian Studies
  • A minimum proficiency in at least one East Asian language (200-level or above)
    • Duke offers courses in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Tibetan
  • The skills to undertake research on an East Asian topic

Requirements

  • You must take at least six courses from the designated East Asian certificate course list.
    • One gateway course for the certificate
    • One approved capstone seminar course
    • Four elective courses at the 200-level or above, including East Asian Language courses
  • No more than three courses should be taken in any one department or program
  • You are required to develop an online portfolio that reflects your accomplishments in the certificate program.
    • Including at least 12 entries with your six certificate courses reflected
    • A digital reporting of how each piece meets the certificate goals

Application

You are encouraged to declare your interest in receiving a certificate in East Asian studies by your fifth semester.

East Asian Studies Certificate Application Steps:

  1. Register for the certificate electronically through ACES by completing a “long-range plan” and a “what if” report. Questions about this process should be directed to your Academic Advisor.
  2. Contact APSI at apsi@duke.edu or 919-684-2604 with a notification about your intention to complete the certificate. Set up an appointment for advising to learn more about specific course offerings and other important certificate requirements.

 

Fall 2016 Courses Offerings

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate gateway courses: 

Gateway Seminar: Asia Global History with Professor Prasenjit Duara

HISTORY 162S

(CCI, CZ, SS)

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

Emerging Markets with Professor Giovanni Zanalda

ECON 379, ICS 379 – Prerequisites: ECON 205D, ECON 208D and ECON 210D

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

This course analyzes the rise of emerging markets/economies and their new roles in the context of global economy. This course focuses on the post-1970s growth of countries such as China, India, South Korea, Chile, Mexico, and Brazil (and/or other countries according to students’ interests) with particular emphasis on financial, industrial/trading and institutional aspects, linking such rise to the emergence of vast global economic imbalances and new trend in capital and trade flows of the last decade. The coursework will explore economic and policy challenges these countries and their companies increasingly face and implications for the world economy.

 

Democracy and Social Choice with Professor Emerson Niou

POLSCI 333S

(CCI, SS)

This course introduces students to the study of social choice and democratic theory. Social choice theory studies the properties of political institutions by which individual preferences are aggregated into collective choices. It provides a useful and powerful analytical framework to understand the choice and consequence of various political institutions in various democratic political systems. Course topics include politics of suffrage, secret vs. open ballot, electoral systems, representative districting, term limits, presidential vs. parliamentary systems, party formation, coalitional government, etc.

 

Interethnic Intimacies with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S/515S; LIT 415S, AMI 415S, CULANTH 415S, VMS 416S, ICS 415S

Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar.

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The coursework examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other.

 

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate capstone seminar course:

East Asian Treaty Ports with Professor Simon Partner

HISTORY 518S

(CCI, R, SS)

The course will examine the treaty ports of East Asia: Shanghai, Tianjin, Yokohama, Nagasaki and others from the perspective of both foreign and local residents. Students will review available English language sources, and carry out a research project on a city of their choice.

Global Asia Initiative

In the spring of 2016, Duke University’s Global Asia Initiative (GAI) launched its program on campus. GAI director, Professor Prasenjit Duara outlines the initiative’s mission in the above video.

GAI joined the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Inter-Asian Connections program as a Coordinating Partner and a hub for nodal research activities in March 2016.  The SSRC project has been active together with its coordinating partners in National University of Singapore, Hong Kong University, Yale University, Gottingen University and several other sponsoring partners across the world since 2008. It has held five international conferences and funded the research of over 50 junior scholars since then.  http://www.ssrc.org/programs/interasia-program/. By working closely with this global research network, it is hoped that Duke’s GAI, drawing on the resources of Duke and the Triangle area, will become one of its most important hubs in the US.

Global Asia Initiative website

 

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 3

JAPANESE CINEMA
with Professor Takushi Odagiri

(CCI, ALP, CZ) 

AMES 261, LIT 213, AMI 255, VMS 232

This course is an introduction to the history of Japanese cinema.  Focusing on the issues of relations between the tradition-modernity or Japan-West in the development of Japanese cinema, the influence of Japanese films on the theory and practice of cinema abroad, and the ways in which cinema has served as a reflection of and an active agent in the transformation of Japanese society this course provides a broad overview of Japanese cinema.

 

GATEWAY SEMINAR: ASIA IN GLOBAL HISTORY
with Professor Prasenjit Duara

(CCI, CZ, SS)

HISTORY 162S

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN EASTERN EUROPE AND ASIA
with Professor Mustafa Tuna

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

SES 375S, HISTORY 333S, POLSCI 359S, PUBPOL 282S

This course combines perspectives of political sociology and history questioning the respective roles of state policies and social movements in transforming societies. The course explores concepts such as social engineering, violence, revolution, totalitarianism, social movements, non-violent resistance, collective action and many others. This course reviews historically-informed case studies of: colonialism/anti-colonial movements (passive resistance and nationalism) in India; revolutionary communism, socialist reconstruction of society, everyday resistance and collective dissent in the Soviet Bloc; authoritarian capitalism and dissent in the form of environmentalist and anti-corruption movements in post-Maoist China.

Learn a Less Commonly Studied Language

Duke University offers several less commonly studied languages: Haitian Creole, Hebrew, K’iche’ Maya, and Tibetan. These languages all carry the FL code and can be applied towards Duke’s foreign languages requirement.

Haitian Creole Studies at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • CREOLE 101 & 701 – Elementary Creole I

An introduction to the essential elements of Haitian Creole or Kreyòl language and aspects of Haitian culture. The first of the two-semester sequence of elementary Haitian Creole or Kreyòl, the course provides practice in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the language, culturally contextualized through units on health care, Haitian women¿s rights issues, and unpaid child servants (restavèk). Students will acquire enough vocabulary and idioms to be able to interact with Haitians. Taught in Haitian Creole. No pre-requisite

  • CREOLE 203 & 703 – Intermediate Creole I

First semester of intermediate Haitian Creole or Kreyol. This course moves beyond survival skills in Creole to more complex social interactions and expressions of analysis and opinion. Intermediate skills in understanding, speaking, writing, reading will be contextualized within a broad range of issues such as rural life in Haiti, religion, frenchified Creole vs popular Creole, through texts, poems, and excerpts taken from novels in Haitian Creole. Students will learn to carefully follow contemporary events and debates in Haitian culture using internet resources in Creole. Pre-requisite: Creole 102 or equivalent. Taught in Haitian Creole.

Why Study Haitian Creole?

  • Haitian Creole is a Francophone language with influences from Portuguese, Spanish, and West African Languages.
  • Haitian Creole is one of the official languages of Haiti.
  • Haitian Creole is spoken by over world, but mainly in the Caribbean.
  • Duke University Haitian Creole lecturer Jacques Pierre develops online video teaching tools available here.

Duke Opportunities:

K’iche’ Maya at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • KICHE 101 & 703 – Elementary K’iche’ Maya I

Introduction to essential elements of K’iche’ Maya language and aspects of Maya culture. K’iche’ Maya, a language spoken by about a million people in the western Highlands of Guatemala, is one of the major indigenous languages in the Americas. Emphasis on active language production to develop basic conversational skills for everyday interactions. No pre-requisite.

  • KICHE 203 & 703 – Intermediate K’iche’ Maya I

Develops greater competencies in writing in K’iche’ and translation to/from K’iche’. Covers more advanced grammar (verb modalities) and broader range of scripts (colonial vs. modern orthography). Research conducted in K’iche’ using the Oral History archive at the University of New Mexico. Students select a story from the online archive, listen to audio, correct transcription, rewrite it in modern orthography and translate it into contemporary English to present to classmates. Prerequisite: K’iche’ Maya 102 or equivalent.

Why study K’iche’ Maya?

  • K’iche’ is the most spoken indigenous language of the Mayan people living in the highlands of Central America, Guatemala, and El Salvador.
  • K’iche’ is the language of the Popol Wuj, the sacred book of the Maya, which dates to the 16th century.
  • Course taught “live” by Vanderbilt University Professor Mareike Sattle; students participate through videoconference / telepresence classrooms.

Duke Opportunities:

Hebrew Language at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • HEBREW 101 – Elementary Modern Hebrew

This course assumes that students enter with either little or no background in the language. Typically, students begin the course without any prior study or, at most, some knowledge from after-school Hebrew programs. We begin with a review of the Hebrew aleph-bet, and quickly move to develop students’ skills in conversation, reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Grammar is taught based on communicative needs. By the end of the first semester, students will be able to conjugate active verbs in the present tense, and will be introduced to active past-tense constructions; recognize and use simple syntactic structures; read and write texts with non-compound sentences. This course is taught in the fall semester only.

  • HEBREW 203 – Intermediate Modern Hebrew

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 002. Based on the skills learned during the first year of study, this course continues with a similar method, developing skills in all areas of language acquisition. Verb study will be taught according to the binyanim, and in general, grammar study will be more structured. Conversation will continue to be emphasized with stress on creating flexibility and elasticity in students’ skills. Formal presentations will be required, and students will begin to write texts requiring critical thought. Toward the end of the semester, standard Hebrew texts drawn from literary sources will be read, analyzed, and discussed in class. By the end of Hebrew 063, students will have completed a introduction to the grammar and basic syntactic structures of modern Hebrew. They will also be able to converse on a number of topics and to discuss simple critical ideas. This course is taught in the fall semester only.

  • HEBREW 391 – Independent Study

Why Study Hebrew?

  • Hebrew is the language of the Jewish Bible (the Christian “Old Testament”).
  • Hebrew is unique: a language with a 3,000 year history.
  • Hebrew is the primary language of Israel, one of the world’s fastest-growing high-tech economies and a country of constant prominence and importance on the world stage.
  • Once you know Hebrew, whole libraries of written treasures, ancient and modern, open up to you, as well as one of the most cutting-edge cinema and theater cultures in our modern world.
  • If you are interested in research on the Middle East or in working there, a knowledge of Hebrew is invaluable.

Duke Opportunities:

Tibetan Language at Duke University

Fall 2016 Course Offerings:

  • TIBETAN 101 & 701 – Elementary Tibetan I

Introductory Tibetan language course for students who have little to no knowledge of Tibetan. Development of speaking, listening, reading, writing skills through Tibetan concepts, grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan. Topics include situations of everyday life (e.g. greetings, introductions, family, habits/hobbies, making appointments, food, visiting friends, weather, shopping, etc.) as well as aspects of Tibetan people and culture (e.g. songs, short stories, etc.).

  • TIBETAN 203 & 703 – Intermediate Tibetan I

Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisite: TIBETAN 102 Elementary Tibetan II or equivalent.

Why study Tibetan?

  • Tibetan is the language of a vast region at the heart of Asia and is used in China, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, India, Russia, and Mongolia.
  • Tibetan is the language of the historical Tibet, home to Tibetan Buddhism, the source of one of the world’s richest contemplative traditions.
  • Course taught “live” by University of Virginia instructor Tsetan Chonjore; students participate through videoconference / telepresence classrooms.

Duke Opportunities:

 

 

Testing your Geographical Knowledge

Join Duke University lecturer Jacques Pierre and Haitian Creole students from many universities for a test of your geographical knowledge in this fifth set of riddles/memonèt.

Watch the first set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/_MzZq_WTW8Q

Watch the second set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/t2KuPgtkV48

Watch the third set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/hYIN2STg7qI

Watch the fourth set of memonèt here:
https://youtu.be/e6P55rhbLHA

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 2

Interethnic Intimacies: Production and Consumption

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S, LIT 415S, CULANTH 415S, AMI 415S, VMS 415S, ICS 415S

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ) Gateway course for the Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The class examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar version of this course.

 

Surviving Globalization: The Global South and the Development Imagination

with Professor Michaeline Crichlow

LATAMER 409, AAAS 409, SOCIOL 409, ICS 409, CULANTH 409

(CCI, EI, SS)

Global Change entails a multiplicity of environmental, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that create challenges for development. The Global South, a vital area of the world, has been entangled in this vortex of global change as both catalyst and conductor of an emergent globalizing modernity. The progress of globalization seems beset by multiple stressors, ranging from financial crises and global recession, to climate change, state and non-state conflicts, free ranging terrorist aggression, and global health scares. What are the odds then of surviving globalization? What role do our imaginations of development play in either creating crises or effectively responding to them?

 

Islam in the Americas

with Professor Mona Hassan

RELIGION 384S, HISTORY 351S, AAAS 274S, AMES 230S

(CCI, W, CZ, SS)

Explores how Muslim communities live and practice Islam in the American context. Examines diverse Muslim communities emerging from transatlantic exploration, trade in slaves, and migration as well as indigenous conversion. Discussion of religious and cultural identities of American Muslim peoples and consideration of questions of communal organization, religious authority, gender dynamics, youth culture, political and civic engagement, as well as American Muslim comedy and entertainment. This course examines the impact of 9/11 upon American Muslims, their responses to the tragedy, and Americans’ shifting perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

 

Melissa Neeley is a Duke Sustainability Leader

2016 Sustain Duke Award Winners

Sustainable Duke seeks to provide leadership in environmental stewardship and sustainability on campus, medical institutions, and within in the larger North Carolina community. Each spring Sustainable Duke awards members of the Duke community who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in the three pillars of sustainability: environmental stewardship, social justice, and economic viability.

This year the Franklin Center’s own Melissa Neeley was honored with the Outstanding Leadership in Sustainability award. Neeley’s efforts promote green actions in the Franklin Center. In the past year, Neeley coordinated Free Store events, advocated for the installation of water bottle refilling stations, and spearheaded recycling initiatives at the Franklin Center. Her leadership continues to provide an excellent example of conservation to her colleagues and the greater Duke and Durham communities.

 

Sustainable Duke recognized:

Outstanding Leadership in Sustainability – Faculty

Daniel Ahlquist, lecturing fellow, Thompson Writing Program

Outstanding Leadership in Sustainability – Staff

Melissa Neeley, operations support staff member, John Hope Franklin Center

Boyd Pickard and David Grizzle, control technicians, Energy Management Controls Shop

Outstanding Leadership in Sustainability – Student

Kelly Shen, senior

Outstanding Leadership in Waste Reduction

Sarah P. Duke Gardens Green Team

John Lohnes, physician assistant, Duke Orthopaedics

Zero Waste Game Day Recognition

Members of Duke Athletics and Duke football were also recognized at the event for their part in helping Duke become the first ACC school to achieve a zero waste gameday.

 

Fall 2016 Feature Courses, part 1

QUEER CHINA

with Professor Carlos Rojas

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 439, AMI 439, CULANTH 439, LIT 439, VMS 439, WOMENST 439

This course examines queer discourse, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. This course focuses on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but also considers a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials.

 

WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 471, AMI 256, CULANTH 255, LIT 212, VMS 234

The WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA broadly defines national, generic, and theoretical boundaries, beyond conventional auteur, genre, one-way influence, and national cinema theories. This course also examines cinematic texts in local, regional, and global contexts and intersections. This course covers variable topics based in theoretical and political discourses on gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, global flows of people and cultures, and popular and “high” culture crossovers, traditional co-productions, remakes, translations and retellings. Previous knowledge of Korean language and culture is not required.

 

MIDDLE EAST AND LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Ellen McLarney 

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 375S, LATAMER 375S
This course will look at how Middle Eastern identities blend with Latin American ones, through migration, institutions, popular media, transnational political ideologies (Marxist, leftist, socialist, populist, nationalist, religious, or feminist), as well as through conversions and proselytizing. Solidarities across the Global South central to Latin American projects to “decolonize the mind,” to mutually inspired “liberation theologies,”, and to new kinds of non-Western feminisms will be covered. This course explores the creative conjuncture of Middle Eastern and Latin American politics and cultures, through immigration and assimilation, institution building, political activism, media production, feminism, and conversion.

CONTEMPORARY TURKISH COMPOSITION AND READINGS

with Professor Erdağ Göknar

(CCI, FL) Prerequisite – Turkish 70

Advanced grammar and syntax with intense composition component. Analytical readings in the original. Prerequisite: Turkish 70 or equivalent.

 

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Jocelyn Olcott


(CCI, CZ) – Gateway for Undergraduate Latin American and Caribbean Studies Certificate

LATAMER 230, HISTORY 330, ICS 327

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the peoples, cultures, and burning issues of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a required course for students seeking the certificate in Latin American Studies.

 

 

Duke Flags Lowered: Humanities Advocate Srinivas Aravamudan Dies

Obituary from Duke Today

DURHAM, NC – Srinivas Aravamudan, professor of English and former dean of the humanities at Duke, died on Wednesday. He was 54.

Aravamudan, a scholar of 18th-century British and French literature and postcolonial literature, was also a champion of the humanities, committed to nurturing and promoting their role in contemporary society. At Duke, his leadership included serving as director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, as dean of the humanities and as director of the Humanities Writ Large initiative.

Aravamudan’s advocacy on behalf of the humanities also extended beyond Duke. He served as president of the international Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes, an association of 207 humanities organizations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, India, Africa and the Pacific Rim.

At Duke, Aravamudan spearheaded Humanities Writ Large, a major Mellon Foundation-funded initiative focused on the humanities. The five-year initiative aims to redefine the role of humanities in undergraduate education. It emphasizes undergraduate humanities research and interdisciplinary Humanities Labs.

“I knew I would be changed as a person within the first few moments of meeting Srinivas,” said Valerie Ashby, the dean of Duke’s Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. “He taught me great deal about the humanities. He was such a gracious person, and such a humble champion of the humanities. He had an immense impact on Duke through his leadership at Duke through Humanities Writ Large and his work at the Franklin Humanities Institute, and nationally through his leadership of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes. He made a difference, helped us all to care about what matters, and he will be deeply missed.”

Before arriving at Duke, Aravamudan received his Ph.D. at Cornell University and taught at the University of Utah and the University of Washington. He joined the Duke faculty in the fall of 2000, teaching in the English and Romance studies departments and the literature program.

Aravamudan also published several prize-winning volumes on 18th-century and postcolonial literature. His book “Tropicopolitans: Colonialism and Agency 1688-1804” won the Modern Language Association’s outstanding first book prize in 2000. In 2005, he published a new edition of William Earle’s antislavery romance “Obi: or, The History of Three-Fingered Jack.” His award-winning book “Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel” was published in 2012. He was at work on several additional volumes, including a book on the history of the university.

“We are very sad to have lost a greatly esteemed colleague, a delightful, playful and witty friend, and a leader of vision and compassion,” said Sarah Beckwith, a professor of English and religion who chairs the English department. “Srinivas served the department, the college, and the wider national and international constituencies of humanities centers with passion, dedication and a great sense of joy and fun. Our hearts go out to our dear colleague, Ranji Khanna, and to all of Srinivas’ family.”

Aravamudan’s wife, Ranjana Khanna, is a professor of English, women’s studies and literature at Duke.

“Srinivas made extraordinary and influential scholarly contributions amounting to whole-scale re-orientations of the field of 18th studies, post-colonial studies and the history and theory of the novel, one of literature’s most inventive, capacious and enduring forms,” Beckwith added.  “He brought his great intellectual gifts and his leadership skills together to unusual and marked effect.”