Critical Genealogies of Middle East Studies – Fall 2017

Course number:  AMES 620S, Gateway course for the Graduate Middle East Studies Certificate

Course attributes: CCS, CZ, SS

Course description:

This graduate seminar provides a comparative analysis of foundational theoretical and intellectual texts of Middle East Studies. With an interdisciplinary focus on culture, history, politics, literature, religion, and policy, readings and presentations by experts in the field will reveal how knowledge of the Middle East is produced within the framework of specific disciplinary traditions. Secondary focus on orientalism, gender, cultural studies, literary theory, and postcolonialism.

Professors biographies:

Professor Erdağ Göknar teaches in Duke’s Asian & Middle Eastern Studies department and is the director of the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. Professor Göknar’s research focuses on the intersection of politics and culture in the Middle East; specifically, the late Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. He is also interested in exploring questions of Turkish and Muslim representation in literature, historiography, and popular culture/media. This includes examining tensions between city and nation at the nexus of representational and political power. Professor Göknar’s work has focused the political critiques of state ideology embedded in literary and historical tropes in the work of authors like Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk and on the critical role played by writers in representations of political violence such as cultural revolution, military coups and colonial occupation (a recent project addresses the Occupation of Istanbul after WWI). More generally, he is interested in political imaginaries that emerge out of cultural productions. Areas of additional focus include world literature, the global city, and cultural translation.

Professor Fadi Bardawill teaches at the University of North Carolina’s Department of Asian Studies and Department of Global Studies. He is an anthropologist (Ph.D Columbia University, 2010) who researches the traditions of intellectual inquiry, practices of public criticism, and modalities of political engagement of contemporary Arab intellectuals, both at home and in the diaspora. In doing so, Professor Bardawil investigates theoretical discourses as anthropological objects by tracking their international circulations, translations, analytical uses, and political appropriations.

Currently, he is completing In Marxism’s Wake: The Disenchantment of Levantine Intellectuals, a book that examines the ebbing away of Marxist thought and practice through focusing on the intellectual and political trajectories of a generation – born around 1940 – of previously militant, public intellectuals. I retrace the extinction of revolutionary hopes with the rise of militant sectarian and Islamist political forces, explore the vexed relation of intellectuals to political militancy, and look into the emergence of a fork in critical agendas after the rise of postcolonial critique between diasporic Arab intellectuals, and their Marxist and liberal peers at home. I am also writing an essay on Talal Asad’s work focusing on questions of the anthropologist’s positionality, modes of intellectual inquiry, and spaces of intellectual engagement that will introduce an interview I conducted with him.

 

U.S. Policy in Latin America – Fall 2017

Course number: PUBPOL 590

Course attributes:

Course description:

To the extent possible, this course will examine the major elements of U.S. policy toward the hemisphere as expressed in the planning documents, policy pronouncements, and legislation of the U.S. government.  We will attempt to answer the question: what did U.S. policy makers say they were hoping to accomplish in the region and how successful were they? The course will also introduce students to the interagency process and the range of departments, agencies, and offices with an influence on policy formulation and implementation.  Finally, the course will examine in some detail key policy prescriptions: the formula for economic modernization know as “the Washington Consensus,” Plan Colombia and the War on Drugs, the Summit of the Americas process, and efforts to achieve hemispheric free trade.  The course will also consider the significance of the Obama Administration’s decision to restore relations with Cuba, the much-discussed “pivot to Asia”, and the early signals of both change and continuity coming from the new Trump administration.

With the end of the Cold War, U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America was recast. The global Manichaeism of the previous era dissolved with the break-up of the Soviet Union.  For the United States, it became possible to see the Western Hemisphere in a new light.  Absent any real ideological challenges or conventional security threats, U.S. policy toward the region reflected new priorities: specifically a determination to help the nations of the region consolidate and extend political gains, to encourage the overhaul of the region’s always vulnerable economies through structural reform and free trade, to promote regional integration, and fight drug trafficking.

The underlying assumption fueling this policy evolution was that by strengthening representative democracy, spurring development and initiating a process of regional economic integration with democratically elected governments, the interests of all of the countries of the region, including those of the United States, would be advanced.  In the nearly 16 years since 9/11, new factors have arisen which forced the United States to reassess its approach in the region. Illegal immigration, drug trafficking, and drug-related violence have become perennial irritants in our relations with the hemisphere as well as fodder in our domestic political debate, especially in connection with Mexico.

Anti-U.S. populism, particularly in the Andean region, surged and more recently receded. Brazil emerged as the most influential political nation in South America, but recently mired in an economic downturn is struggling with a corruption scandal of historic proportions.  Extra-regional actors, like China, arrived and altered the historically comfortable position of the United States. All of this happened precisely at a moment when the Western Hemisphere has arguably become both more independent of the U.S. than it has ever been, but also more economically important.  Sixteen years into the new millennium, it is now possible to consider the degree to which U.S. policy in Latin America since the end of the Cold War has been effective.

Instructor biography:

Ambassador Patrick Duddy is the Semans International Visiting Professor in Duke University’s Office of Global Affairs and serves as a senior advisor for Global Strategy. He is also director of Duke University’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean studies. He teaches in both the Fuqua School of Business and the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before joining the Duke faculty, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly thirty years.  At his retirement from the U.S. Foreign Service, he was one of the Department of State’s most senior Latin American specialists with exceptionally broad experience in trade, energy, public affairs and crisis management. From 2007 to 2010 he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for both President Bush and President Obama.

Prior to his assignment to Venezuela, Ambassador Duddy was Deputy Assistant Secretary of State (DAS) for the Western Hemisphere. In that capacity, he was directly responsible for the Office of Economic Policy and Summit Coordination, which included the hemispheric energy portfolio, as well for the Offices of Brazil/ Southern Cone Affairs and of Caribbean Affairs.

As U.S. Consul General in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Ambassador Duddy was the ranking American official in the world’s fourth largest city and directed the largest U.S. consulate general in the western hemisphere.   In San Paulo, Duddy served as the senior USG liaison to one of the most dynamic and sophisticated business communities in the world and as a board member of the American Chamber of Commerce in Sao Paulo, the largest American Chamber in the world outside the U.S.  He also served as the Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Brasilia.

Prior to his assignment in Brazil, Duddy served in a variety of positions around the hemisphere and in Washington including senior positions at the U.S. embassies in Bolivia and Panama. Earlier in his career, he also served in U.S. embassies in Paraguay, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic and Chile.

Duddy has served as U.S. head of delegation to international conferences on counter-narcotics, energy, and assistance for Haiti.  He has spoken to a wide range of private sector groups, world affairs councils, NGOs, and universities both in the United States and in Latin America.  He has taught at the National War College in Washington, D.C. and lectured at the Foreign Service Institute of the Department State.  He has published op-ed columns on U.S. foreign and trade policy in English, Spanish and Portuguese and been interviewed by NPR, the BBC, and the Voice of America among others.  Duddy is the recipient of the Secretary of State’s Career Achievement Award and a Presidential Meritorious Service Award.  In May of 2012, Duddy was awarded an honorary Doctor of Public Service degree by Husson University. He speaks Spanish and Portuguese.

Racial Justice in the 20th Century United States and South Africa – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AAAS 346S, HISTORY 396S, ICS 351S, POLSCI 336S, PUBPOL 326S

Course attributes: CCI, R, W, CZ, SS

Course description:

In 1966, Robert Kennedy gave a speech to thousands of University of Cape Town students.  He began with something of a history lesson.  “I came here because of my deep interest and affection for a land settled by the Dutch in the mid-seventeenth century, then taken over by the British, and at last independent; a land in which the native inhabitants were at first subdued, but relations with whom remain a problem to this day; a land which defined itself on hostile frontier; a land which has tamed rich natural resources through the energetic application of modern technology; a land which once imported slaves, and now must struggle to wipe out the last traces of that former bondage.”  Kennedy paused before delivering the punch-line – a punch-line that drew laughter of self-recognition.  “I refer, of course, to the United States of America,” Kennedy concluded.

Scholars, pundits, and historical actors have long drawn parallels between the United States and South Africa – two countries founded on the premises of racial inequality.  In this course, we will explore the machinations of race from the quickening of industrial development to the present.  We will consider the benefits and pitfalls of thinking comparatively, as well as cover such topics as segregation, transatlantic religious and cultural exchanges, living apartheid and Jim Crow, struggles for liberation, the American anti-apartheid movement, memory and the struggles for social change, and the notion of “post-racial societies.”

Professor biography:

Professor Shapiro studies American social and southern history, as well as South African history. She is now engaged in three distinct projects. The first consists of a biography of Archbishop Walter Khotso Makhulu, archbishop of Central Africa between 1980 and 2000.  A graduate of the same seminary and a direct contemporary of Nobel Peace Prize winner, Archbishop Desmond Tutu who served as Archbishop of Cape Town,

Second, explores South Africa’s apartheid-era emigration policy and its relationship to notions of citizenship and state formation, as well as the ways in which passports and other kinds of travel documents formed part of the oppressive apparatus of the successive National Party governments.

Third, Professor Shapiro is researching the transnational careers of seven influential South African medics who came to North Carolina in the 1950s and ‘60s to work at Duke and UNC, Chapel Hill. Primarily epidemiologists and family and community medicine doctors, this cohort adopted a “social medicine” approach. These pioneering doctors generally left South Africa when the National Party introduced apartheid in the late 1940s/1950s. Several ended up in North Carolina, where they had long and illustrious careers.

Iraq & Syria: Arts and Revolutions – Fall 2017

Course number: AMES 222S

Course attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course description:

The course introduces the political and cultural background of the conflict and uprising in Iraq and Syria. Focusing on culture, arts, and literature especially after the Arab Spring 2011 this course uses movies, books, and guest speakers to broaden the understanding of the current war against terrorism and dictatorships.

Professor biography:

Abdul Sattar Jawad (known also as ‘Al-Mamouri’) is an Iraqi-born Professor of Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. He received a Ph.D in English Literature and Journalism, London’s City University (UK). He has been a Barksdale Fellow at the University of Mississippi Honors College; a Visiting Professor at the Department of English and American Language and Literature, Harvard University; and a scholar at the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies at Duke University. Before coming to Duke, he was Dean of College of Arts Mustansiriya University in Baghdad and edited the Baghdad Mirror. Apart from teaching Arabic and English Literature, he is an expert on the works of T. S. Eliot and those of William Shakespeare. He has translated Eliot’s “Waste Land” into Arabic. He is also an expert on Iraqi media and academia. Jawad has written 14 books on literature and media, and has edited several literary magazines and newspapers in English and Arabic.

 

 

Chinese Media and Pop Culture – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AMES 435S, ISS 435, POLSCI 435

Course attribution: ALP, SS, CCI

Course Description:

The course examines contemporary Chinese media and popular culture within the context of globalization. The primary modes of inquiry are cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, and comparative, focusing on how China views itself and constructs its global images, and how the world views China through media and popular culture. The primary objective is to understand political, ideological and social changes since the Reform Era that began in 1978. It explores different aspects of Chinese media (traditional news press, radio and TV, and the internet and social media), and popular culture such as cinema, popular music and fashions, and global perception and media coverage of China.

Professor biography:

Professor Kang Liu has taught Chinese Studies at Duke University since 2003. His current research project covers global public opinion surveys of China’s image, Chinese soft power and public diplomacy, Chinese media and popular culture, political and ideological changes in China.

 

 

 

Introduction to African Studies – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HISTORY 129, POLISCI 108, ICS 110

Course attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course Description:

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender.

Professor biography:

Charlie Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, where he has a joint appointment in African and African American Studies.  His area of specialization is the political economy and cultural history of rural West Africa.  His first book, Remotely Global: Village Modernity in West Africa (1999) attempted to re-theorize a classic out-of-the-way place as within the modern and global.  His recent book, Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War (2010), explores shifts in Togolese political culture during the 1990s, a time when the NGOs and charismatic churches take over biopolitics, organizing social and political life in the absence of the state.  His current project is on Togolese who apply for and attempt to game the US Diversity Visa lottery.

 

 

Islamic Mysticism – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AMES 373S, ETHICS 373S, ICS 380S, RELIGION 373S

Course attributions: CCI, EI, CZ

Course Description:

This course explores the mystical dimension of Islam, with a bold, poetic, and mystical emphasis on the legacy of human and Divine love.   No background is needed.

Themes explored in this class include the tradition of love poetry of Rumi and Hafez, the various meditative techniques, Sufi poetry and music. We will also explore the controversies surrounding Sufism in the contemporary scene ranging from attacks on Sufism from Muslim fundamentalists to the destruction of Sufi shrines by ISIS and Wahhabis.

Professor biography:

Professor Omid Safi is an award-winning professor in the department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and the director of the Duke Islamic Studies Center.

 

 

 

Apartheid South Africa and the Struggles for Democracy – Fall 2017

Course number: AAAS 316S, POLSCI 336S, PUBPOL 326S, HISTORY 396S

Course attributes: CCI, EI, R, CZ, SS

Course description: 

Working through an array of diverse organizations – including the African National Congress, the Pan African Congress, the Black Consciousness Movement, a host of liberal organizations, the churches, the trade union federations, and countless more – black and some white South Africans fought against apartheid from its inception.  In 1994 they achieved a multi-racial democracy led by President Nelson Mandela.  This seminar explores key themes in post-World War II South African history, paying special attention to the plethora of anti-apartheid struggles, while giving voice to some pro-apartheid proponents.

The readings are arranged both chronologically and thematically.  Over the course of the term, we will discuss how apartheid affected people’s daily lives, the ideological and programmatic opposition to apartheid, and the internecine struggles between and within the anti-apartheid organizations and movements.  We will conclude the course with contemporary reflections on life during apartheid.

Professor biography:

Professor Shapiro studies American social and southern history, as well as South African history. She is now engaged in three distinct projects. The first consists of a biography of Archbishop Walter Khotso Makhulu, archbishop of Central Africa between 1980 and 2000.  A graduate of the same seminary and a direct contemporary of Nobel Peace Prize winner, Archbishop Desmond Tutu who served as Archbishop of Cape Town,

Second, explores South Africa’s apartheid-era emigration policy and its relationship to notions of citizenship and state formation, as well as the ways in which passports and other kinds of travel documents formed part of the oppressive apparatus of the successive National Party governments.

Third, Professor Shapiro is researching the transnational careers of seven influential South African medics who came to North Carolina in the 1950s and ‘60s to work at Duke and UNC, Chapel Hill. Primarily epidemiologists and family and community medicine doctors, this cohort adopted a “social medicine” approach. These pioneering doctors generally left South Africa when the National Party introduced apartheid in the late 1940s/1950s. Several ended up in North Carolina, where they had long and illustrious careers.

 

Postwar Europe, 1945-1968: Politics, Society & Culture – Fall 2017

Course numbers: HISTORY 537S, POLISCI 515S, ICS 537S

Course attributions: CCI, EI, STS, CZ, SS

Course description: 

Politics, society, and culture in Western Europe during the postwar years focusing on Cold War culture, liberalism and intellectual life. “East” and “West” during the Cold War: A comparative examination of Western European societies’ and movements’ responses to communism, highlighting debates on the morality of socialism and capitalism and on liberty, historical determinism, and individual responsibility. Examination of the anxieties and hopes evoked by postwar technological and economic progress – by “Americanization” and the “Economic Miracle.”

Professor biography:

Malachi Haim Hacohen (PhD, Columbia) is Bass Fellow and Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Duke University, and Director of the Council for European Studies and of the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.  His research focuses on Jewish European history, and he has published on the Central European Jewish intelligentsia, Cold War liberalism, nation and empire in Austrian history, and cosmopolitanism and Jewish Identity. His Karl Popper – The Formative Years: Politics and Philosophy in Interwar Vienna won the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the AHA and the Victor Adler State Prize. He had Fellowships from the ACLS, Fulbright, Mellon, and Whiting Foundation. He was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, the National Humanities Center, and the IFK in Vienna.  He presently leads an international project on “Empire, Socialism and Jews“.  His Jacob  & Esau: Jewish European History Between Nation and Empire is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press.

 

Indian Cinema – Fall 2017

Course numbers: AMES 251, AMI 253, LIT 211, VMS 231

Course attributes: CCI, R, ALP, CZ

Course description:

Traditional Indian aesthetics emphasizes the experience of the viewer.  Less attention is paid to how the “external” world is represented; far greater attention is paid to how the “internal” world is stirred by a work of art.   In this introduction to Indian cinema, we will extend our usual way of analyzing the latent ideology of art by practicing traditional Indian sensitivity.  We will ask ourselves the following questions:  What kind of participation does a film invite? Who does it encourage us to become as we watch the film—how alert, how sensitive, how informed, how speculative?  What emotional effect does the film have upon us?  Could that effect be described as catharsis? What might traditional Indian theoreticians mean when they describe the “tasting” of basic emotions induced by a work of art as the height of aesthetic experience?

Professor biography: 

Professor Khanna’s teaching and research interests lie in the application of Indian aesthetics to film and modern Hindi literature.  He pays particular attention to the design of dhvani (resonance) in imaginative works.  Professor Khanna’s recent translations from Hindi literature have been the poet Nirala’s fictional autobiography (A Life Misspent, 2016), the novelist Mohan Rakesh’s India travelogue (Out to the Farthest Rock, 2015), and the poet Vinod Kumar Shukla’s novel (Once it Flowers, 2014).

He also interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. Professor Khanna’s recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.