Millennial Capitalism: Global Perspectives – Spring 2019

Course Number: CULANTH 530S

Course Attributes: CCI, CZ, R, SS

Course Description:

This course historicizes the conditions under which a specific form of capitalism emerges; one primarily focused on financialization and debt. Students begin by looking to the inception of market capitalism in the Atlantic world accounting for its cultural logics: How race and racism operate in tandem with capital; the significance of the slave trade and the institution of slavery; the fact of empires and peripheries; and the centrality of gender to private property relations. The course concludes with an inquiry into those new forms of work and corollary forms of alienation that define the digital age.

Anne-Maria MakhuluFaculty Biography:

Anne-Maria Makhulu is an Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies and Core Faculty in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, neoliberalism, the anthropology of finance and corporations, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature of South Africa. Makhulu is co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010) and the author of Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home (2015). She is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism(2010), author of articles in Anthropological Quarterly and PMLA, special issue guest editor for South Atlantic Quarterly (115(1)) and special theme section guest editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (36(2)). A new project, South Africa After the Rainbow (in preparation), examines the relationship between race and mobility in postapartheid South Africa.

CULANTH_530_Poster

 

Introduction to African Studies – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 103, CULANTH 105, HIST 129, POLSCI 108, ICS 110

Course Attributes: ALP, CCI, CZ

Course Description:

This course offers a broad introduction to the archaeology, history, politics, language, culture, aesthetics, and religion of African peoples. With the help of a variety of sources—scholarly works by historians, anthropologists, literary figures, filmmakers, and journalist—we will explore the ways in which Africans, across a massive and incredibly diverse continent, have responded to and engaged with the slave trade, colonial overrule, transnational markets, and to other more recent experiences and challenges after political independence.

Faculty Biographies:

Samuel Fury DalySamuel Fury Childs Daly specializes in the history of twentieth-century Africa. His research bridges West and East Africa, and it combines legal, military, and social historical approaches to the study of the past. His current project considers the history of the Biafra War (1967-1970). This book manuscript entitled Sworn on the Gun: Law and Crime in the Nigerian Civil War draws a connection between the crisis conditions of the war and the forms of crime that came to be associated with Nigeria in its wake. Using an original body of legal records from the secessionist Republic of Biafra, it traces how technologies, survival practices, and moral ideologies that emerged in the context of the fighting shaped the practice and perception of crime after Biafra’s defeat. Connecting the violence of the battlefield to violent crime, it provides a new perspective on the discursive relationship between law and disorder in the African postcolony. His other areas of interest include customary law in the British Empire, the history of vigilantism in Tanzania, and the methodologies of postcolonial African history.
 
Anne-Maria MakhuluAnne-Maria Makhulu is an Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies and Core Faculty in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Duke University. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, neoliberalism, the anthropology of finance and corporations, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature of South Africa. Makhulu is co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010) and the author of Making Freedom: Apartheid, Squatter Politics, and the Struggle for Home (2015). She is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism(2010), author of articles in Anthropological Quarterly and PMLA, special issue guest editor for South Atlantic Quarterly (115(1)) and special theme section guest editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (36(2)). A new project, South Africa After the Rainbow (in preparation), examines the relationship between race and mobility in postapartheid South Africa.

S19_AAAS_103

Development and Africa – Spring 2019

Course Number: AAAS 307, CULANTH 307, PUBPOL 207, ICS 308

Course Attribute: CCI, CZ, SS

Course Description:

This course addresses the vexed issue of economic development in Africa with its many failures and occasional successes from the early colonial period to the present. Course materials focus especially on the transition from the 1960s “modernizing” moment to the millennium projects and humanitarian aid of the present. Students will read the works of development experts, World Bank executives, anthropologists, and historians, asking why this massively financed project has experienced such failure and exploring what can be done.

Charles PiotFaculty Biography:

Charlie Piot, Ph.D. University of Virginia 1986, Chair and Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies, does research on the political economy and history of rural West Africa. His first book, Remotely Global: Village Modernity in West Africa (1999), attempted to retheorize a classic out-of-the-way place as within the modern and the global. His recent book, Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War (2010), explores shifts in Togolese political culture during the 1990s, a time when the NGOs and charismatic churches take over the biopolitical, reorganizing social and political life in the absence of the state.  His current project is on Togolese who apply for and attempt to game the US Diversity Visa Lottery. 

 

Development and Africa

U.S. Policy in Latin America – Spring 2019

Course Number: PUBPOL 590-04, LATAMER 590-04, POLSCI 690-2-04

Course Time: Tuesdays 4:40 p.m. – 7:10 p.m.

Course Description: 

To the extent possible, this course will examine the major elements of U.S. policy toward the hemisphere as expressed in the planning documents, policy pronouncements and legislation of the U.S. government.  We will attempt to answer the question: what were U.S. policymakers hoping to accomplish in the region and what did they, in fact, achieve? The course will also introduce students to the interagency process and the range of departments, agencies, and offices with an influence on policy formulation and implementation in the Western Hemisphere.  Finally, the course will examine in some detail key policy prescriptions: the formula for economic modernization know as “the Washington Consensus,” Plan Colombia and the War on Drugs, the Summit of the Americas process, and efforts to achieve hemispheric free trade, including the Trump administration’s decision to force a renegotiation of NAFTA.  The course will also consider the significance of the Obama Administration’s decision to restore relations with Cuba and the much-discussed “pivot to Asia.”

Patrick DuddyFaculty Biography:

Patrick Duddy, a Visiting Senior Lecturer at Duke University, was one of the Department of State’s most senior Latin American specialists with exceptionally broad experience in trade, energy, public affairs, and crisis management. From 2007 to 2010 he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for both President Bush and President Obama. Prior to this, Ambassador Duddy served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State (DAS) for the Western Hemisphere, responsible for the Office of Economic Policy and Summit Coordination, which included the hemispheric energy portfolio, as well for the Offices of Brazil/ Southern Cone Affairs and of Caribbean Affairs. During his tenure as DAS, he played a lead role in coordinating U.S. support for the restoration of democracy in Haiti.

 

U.S. Policy Poster

African Economic Development – Spring 2019

Course Number: ECON 347

Course Attributes: R, SS, W

Course Description: 

Today, Africa presents two seemingly contradictory faces. As a continent, the economy has been growing briskly. It is in process of transformation with modern infrastructure and glittering megacities. Investors from Europe, China and elsewhere flock to Africa. Yet, in the South of Sahel, about 40% of the population remains in stinging poverty, deprived of many basic needs such as education, healthcare, and electricity. Ethnic and religious contestations continue to create an undercurrent of social and political instability, and malaria, HIV/AIDS and other diseases take an unacceptably large number of lives. While the African economy is still small relative to the rest of the world, Africa’s future – the “last frontier” of the global economy – cannot be ignored. This course studies economic development in sub-Saharan Africa since independence, with a focus on challenges that the continent faces at present in shaping an inclusive future. It will be taught from the perspectives of policymaker and practitioner, supported by the relevant academic literature.
Hiro HinoFaculty Biography:
Prof. Hiroyuki Hino, a native of Japan, began his professional career as an economist in the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1975, after receiving his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Rochester. At the IMF, he held various positions, including Division Chief and Assistant Director in the Policy Development and Review Department; Resident Representative to the Philippines; Assistant Director and Senior Advisor in the African Department; and finally, Director of the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. During his tenure at the IMF, he participated in the formation of IMF policies on the external indebtedness of developing countries and the establishment of the IMF lending facility for low-income countries. In addition, he took part in negotiations of the IMF financial assistance program with a number of countries, including Thailand, India, China, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, Kenya, and Nigeria. He retired from the IMF in 2006 and returned to Japan.
Back in Japan, Hino joined Kobe University as Professor of Economics at its Research Institute of Economics and Business Administration (RIEB). He was commissioned by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 2007 to undertake a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of “Ethnic Diversity and Economic Instability in Africa”. He established a team of prominent scholars in economics, history, political science, and anthropology from Africa, Europe, the US, and Japan to undertake this task. The study’s main findings were published as a collective volume (Hino et al, Ethnic Diversity and Economic Instability in Africa: Inter-Disciplinary Perspectives, Cambridge University Press, 2012). He was also commissioned by JICA in 2011 to conduct a comprehensive study on the Challenges of Youth and Employment in Africa as the background for the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) in 2013. The report’s summary was presented as a Policy Brief in a TICAD high-level panel discussion; the panelists consisted of the Presidents of three African countries (South Africa, Tanzania, and Gabon) and three development agencies (the World Bank, African Development Bank and JICA), as well as the Executive Director of J-PAL at MIT. The papers prepared for this study were published as a collective volume (Hino and Ranis, Youth and Employment in Sub-Sahara Africa: Working But Poor, Routledge 2013). Hino retired from Kobe University in 2015 and continues to hold an honorary position of Research Fellow.
Hino was the Economic Advisor to the Prime Minister of Kenya during 2009–2013 and the Senior Advisor to the Presidency of Kenya for Strategic Initiatives and Economy during 2013–2014 on special assignment from Kobe University and as a JICA expert. During these periods, he was involved in a wide range of economic policy issues, including unemployment, devolution, drought emergency, promotion of renewable energy, sustainability of natural resources, and others. In addition, he carefully studied the issues of ethnicity, horizontal inequality and social cohesion in Kenya, supporting a major study by the Kenya Institute of Public Policy, Research, and Analysis (KIPPRA).
After completing his assignments in Kenya, Hino moved to Yale University as a Visiting Professor (2014–2015), where he taught a course on the challenges of Africa’s economic transformation. He subsequently moved to the University of Cape Town (UCT) as a Visiting Professor at the Southern Africa Labour & Development Research Unit (SALDRU), a position he still holds. At UCT, he took part in its Poverty and Inequality Initiative (PII) and engaged in research on poverty, inequality and social cohesion in South Africa and, more broadly, in sub-Saharan Africa. His most recent work in this area is presented in a SALDRU working paper, “Identity, Inequality and Social Contestation in the Post-Apartheid South Africa”, for which he is a co-author: http://www.opensaldru.uct.ac.za/handle/11090/946(link is external). This paper will be published as a chapter in Hino et al, From Divided Pasts to Cohesive Futures? Reflections on Africa, Cambridge University Press, 2019.
ECON_347_Poster

Poetic Cinema – Spring 2019

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S

Course Attributes: CCI, ALP, CZ

Course Description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with an emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Satti KhannaFaculty Biography:

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

 

 

Poetic Cinema