Everyday Conversions: Attiya Ahmad

Highlights from Dr. Attiya Ahmad’s talk at the John Hope Franklin Center as part of our weekly Wednesdays at the Center series.

 

Why are domestic workers converting to Islam in the Arabian Peninsula and Persian Gulf region? In this talk, Dr. Attiya Ahmad presents us with an original analysis of this phenomenon. Using extensive fieldwork conducted among South Asian migrant women in Kuwait, Ahmad argues domestic workers’ Muslim belonging emerges from their work in Kuwaiti households as they develop Islamic piety in relation—but not opposition—to their existing religious practices, family ties, and ethnic and national belonging. Their conversion is less a clean break from their preexisting lives than it is a refashioning in response to their everyday experiences. In examining the connections between migration, labor, gender, and Islam, Ahmad complicates conventional understandings of the dynamics of religious conversion and the feminization of transnational labor migration while proposing the concept of everyday conversion as a way to think more broadly about emergent forms of subjectivity, affinity, and belonging.

Dr. Attiya Ahmad is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs at The George Washington University. Broadly conceived, her research focuses on the gendered interrelation of Islamic reform movements and political economic processes spanning the Middle East and South Asia, in particular, the greater Arabian Peninsula/Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean regions. Dr. Ahmad is a Ph.D. from Duke University and recently published her first book, “Everyday Conversions: Islam, Domestic Work and South Asian Migrant Women in Kuwait” (Duke University Press, 2017). Dr. Ahmad is currently examining the development of global halal tourism networks.

This event is presented by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

Africa’s ‘Scramble for Europe’

by Angela Griffe
As part of the Wednesday at the Center series, the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies and the Duke Africa Initiative welcomed Dr. Stephen Smith to speak about Africa’s changing “human geography.”

 

Smith addressed a packed room on how shifting African migration patterns are changing the European continent demographics. Comparing the colonial “scramble for Africa” to Africa’s current migration flows towards Europe, Smith asserts that Africa’s growing young middle-class will immigrate to Europe looking for economic prosperity.

 

Since the 1930s, Africa has seen the most significant population growth, the fastest urban growth, and the largest concentration of young people. As the population booms and young people migrate, Africa is seeing mass “rural exodus and urban drift.” Smith explained there is a “quest for modernity,” with young people, especially women, running away from oppressive social structures and seeking a better life.

 

Smith argues that there are three factors in African migration to Europe: global awareness, a preexisting diasporic community, and monetary resources. With many vibrant communities of Afro-Europeans already present, and a growing young middle class attuned to Western popular culture, the setting is ripe for mass migration.

 

By 2050, Smith estimates there will be 5 young Afro-Europeans (two of whom under the age of 15) to every aging European. Analyzing this migration pattern cannot be decided in a “void,” for borders are “spaces of negotiation.” Smith concluded that in the age of globalization and shifting demographics, there are winners and losers; but, “we will all be losers if the winners do not take care of the losers.”

 

Stephen W. Smith teaches African Studies at Duke University. Until 2013, Smith also held an adjunct lecturer position at John Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. Smith holds a Ph.D. in semiotics from Berlin’s Free University and is a graduate of the Anthropology department at the Sorbonne (Panthéon) in Paris.

Whose Anthropocene? Global South Perspectives on Environmental Crisis

Course Number: LATAMER 590S, CULANTH 590S, ENVIRON 590S

Course Attributes: CCI, EI, CZ, SS

Course Time: Thursdays, 4:40pm – 7:10pm

Course Description:

The Anthropocene is defined as the epoch in which human activity has matched the scale of geological processes and disturbed Earth’s thermodynamic balance. Beyond introducing unprecedented environmental crises, the Anthropocene has revealed the inadequacy of Western scientific disciplines to address such problems. In Anthropology and Environmental Studies, promising new forms of engagement with non-Western philosophies are occurring on both sides of the Atlantic. This seminar will address the contributions of Latin American, African, and Asian authors (and artists, shamans, and activists) to the Anthropocene debate.

Renzo TaddeiFaculty Biography:

Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Federal University of Saõ Paulo, Brazil, Dr. Taddei specializes in the anthropology of environment and climate. He is also affiliated with the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

 

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Water and Society: Concepts and Controversies in Latin America – Fall 2018

Course Number: LATAMER 390, CULANTH 290, ENVIRON 390

Course Attributes: CCI, STS, CZ, SS

Course Time: Wednesdays, 4:40pm – 7:10pm

Course Description:

Water is central to the past, present, and future of humanity. Latin America has been and continues to be a place where some of the most important discussions on and events related to water and human societies occur. This course addresses the role of water in local societies, examines how environmental conflicts over water shape and reflect social and cultural diversity, and explores how water’s fate symbolizes future challenges for Latin America and the planet. This course studies water and society from several perspectives including:

  • cultural and political ecology
  • traditional environmental knowledge
  • technology and engineering
  • meteorology
  • international policy
  • arts, film, and literature

Renzo TaddeiFaculty Biography:

Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Federal University of Saõ Paulo, Brazil, Dr. Taddei specializes in the anthropology of environment and climate. He is also affiliated with the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

 

LATAMER 390 Poster

Scripture: Judaism, Christianity & Islam – Fall 2018

Course Number: RELIGION 156, AMES 138, JEWISHST 156

Course Attributes: CCI, EI, ALP, CZ

Course Time: Tues. & Thurs., 11:45am – 1:00pm

Course Description:

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are characterized as religions of the book. Their sacred texts are foundational to the faiths they represent. In spite of shared histories, overlapping contents, and parallel perspectives, their Sacred Scriptures diverge in key points of content, interpretation, and uses by their communities. In this course, students will be introduced to the history, contours, and content of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the New Testament, and the Qur’an and hadith, exploring issues of scripture and authority, texts and manuscripts, translation and interpretation, performance, canonicity, ethical issues, and contemporary use.

Faculty biographies:

Marc Zvi Brettler is an American biblical scholar, and the Bernice and Morton Lerner Professor in Judaic Studies at Duke University. He earned his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Brandeis University, where he previously served as Dora Golding Professor of Biblical Studies. He researches biblical metaphors, the Bible and gender, biblical historical texts, the book of Psalms, and the post-biblical reception of the Hebrew Bible, including in the New Testament. He is a co-founder of the website thetorah.com, which integrates critical and traditional methods of studying the Bible.

 

 

Marc GoodacreMark Goodacre is a Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Duke University. He specializes in the New Testament and Christian Origins. He earned his MA, M.Phil, and DPhil at the University of Oxford and was Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham until 2005.

His research interests include Jesus, the Synoptic Gospels, John’s Gospel, the Gospel of Thomas and Jesus in Film. He is the author of four books including The Case Against Q: Studies in Markan Priority and the Synoptic Problem (Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2002) and Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas’s Familiarity with the Synoptics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012). He is well known for internet sites like The New Testament Gateway and his podcast, the NT Pod.

ellen mclarneyEllen McLarney’s training is in Middle East Studies, Islamic Studies, and Comparative Literature. Her field of specialization is in Arabic literature, with a specific focus on the literary culture of Islamic societies. Her book Soft Force: Women in Egypt’s Islamic Awakening explores how Muslim women writers describe Islamic conceptions of women’s liberation, women’s rights, and women’s equality. She was in the Peace Corps in Morocco where she taught in the university and has lived in Tunisia, Egypt, Jerusalem, and Syria. 

 

 

 

Scripture Flyer

 

Indian Cinema – Fall 2018

Course Number: AMES 151, LIT 211, AMI 253, VMS 231

Course Attributes: CCI, R, ALP, CZ

Course Time: Tues. & Thurs., 3:05pm – 4:20pm

Course Description:

This course will investigate sources of vitality in twentieth-century Indian cinema and the resilience of popular cinema in the face of Hollywood. Students will view both narrative and non-narrative expressive forms in folk and high culture in India. Students of this course will watch works of Guru Dutt, Satyajit Ray, G. Aravindan, and Mani Kaul.

Satti KhannaFaculty Biography:

Satti Khanna teaches courses in Indian Cinema and Hindi Literature but his love is the Hindi language, which he learned in childhood, in addition to his native Punjabi.  His classes are intensely interactive.  He prizes the use of Indian films to communicate culture.

 

 

 

India Cinema

Contemporary Turkish Composition and Readings – Fall 2018

Course Number: TURKISH 305

Course Attributes: CCI, FL

Course Time: Mon. & Wed., 4:40pm – 5:55pm

Course Description:

Advanced grammar and syntax with intense composition component. Analytical readings in the original. Prerequisite: Turkish 204 or permission of instructor. Placement guidelines.

Didem HavliogluFaculty Biography:

Didem Havlioglu’s research focuses on gender and sexuality in the early modern Ottoman culture production. Didem is particularly interested in women poets and writers and their ways of appropriating the traditional discourse. She has written both in Turkish and English about Ottoman women writers from early modern to Modern periods. Havlioglu’s book project, titled “Mihri Hatun: Performance, Gender-bending and Subversion,” is a study of the first Ottoman woman poet who managed to collect her poetry and achieved an unprecedented success in literary circles of her time. Through her writing, Havlioglu tries to understand the gender structure of Ottoman intellectual history.

 

 

Trinity College of Arts & Science’s Foreign Language Requirement:

The basic requirement is three courses in a given language or a single advanced (300‐)* level course, whichever is attained first.

  • 100 level: Elementary (101–102, or intensive 111, or accelerated 112)
  • 200 level: Intermediate (203–204, or intensive 212, or accelerated 213)
  • 300 level: Advanced

In satisfying the requirement, students may choose one of two options:

  1. Begin a new language at DukeOR
  2. Use their high school or other previous language experience to place into the highest level language course at Duke for which they are qualified.

Students who place into an advanced (300) level course will only have to take one 300‐level FL designated course to satisfy the language requirement. Students who place into the intermediate level will need to take two or three courses (so that their final course is at the advanced [300] level), and students who begin a new language will need to take three courses.

NOTE: These courses must be in the same language. (See Creole exception.) We strongly recommend that students begin their foreign language no later than their sophomore year (preferably by 1st semester). This is especially important for students who will need to take three semesters of a foreign language, who may study away during a fall or spring, and/or who anticipate full course loads that may be inflexible for including foreign language courses later. Students should also be aware that not all departments offer their foreign language courses each semester. This is usually true for Latin, Greek and Asian languages, where the first introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the fall, and the second introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the spring. Studying away can interrupt this sequence and make completing three FL credits by graduation difficult. Students should also be aware that FL courses are not always offered in the summer, and if offered in the summer are subject to cancellation, so they should not rely on the summer for taking FL courses. (Exception: summer study abroad programs.)

Exception: students who wish to study Creole (Kreyol) may fulfill the requirement with either three Creole courses, or with four courses: two courses of Creole and two courses of French.

Intermediate Turkish – Fall 2018

Course Number: TURKISH 203

Course Attributes: FL

Course time: Mon., Wed., & Fri., 1:40pm – 2:30pm

Course Description:

Classroom and laboratory practice in spoken and written patterns. Readings in contemporary literature. Prerequisites: Turkish 101 and 102, 14, or consent of instructor. Placement guidelines.

Didem HavliogluFaculty Biography:

Didem Havlioglu’s research focuses on gender and sexuality in the early modern Ottoman culture production. Didem is particularly interested in women poets and writers and their ways of appropriating the traditional discourse. She has written both in Turkish and English about Ottoman women writers from early modern to Modern periods. Havlioglu’s book project, titled “Mihri Hatun: Performance, Gender-bending and Subversion,” is a study of the first Ottoman woman poet who managed to collect her poetry and achieved an unprecedented success in literary circles of her time. Through her writing, Havlioglu tries to understand the gender structure of Ottoman intellectual history.

 

 

Trinity College of Arts & Science’s Foreign Language Requirement:

The basic requirement is three courses in a given language or a single advanced (300‐)* level course, whichever is attained first.

  • 100 level: Elementary (101–102, or intensive 111, or accelerated 112)
  • 200 level: Intermediate (203–204, or intensive 212, or accelerated 213)
  • 300 level: Advanced

In satisfying the requirement, students may choose one of two options:

  1. Begin a new language at DukeOR
  2. Use their high school or other previous language experience to place into the highest level language course at Duke for which they are qualified.

Students who place into an advanced (300) level course will only have to take one 300‐level FL designated course to satisfy the language requirement. Students who place into the intermediate level will need to take two or three courses (so that their final course is at the advanced [300] level), and students who begin a new language will need to take three courses.

NOTE: These courses must be in the same language. (See Creole exception.) We strongly recommend that students begin their foreign language no later than their sophomore year (preferably by 1st semester). This is especially important for students who will need to take three semesters of a foreign language, who may study away during a fall or spring, and/or who anticipate full course loads that may be inflexible for including foreign language courses later. Students should also be aware that not all departments offer their foreign language courses each semester. This is usually true for Latin, Greek and Asian languages, where the first introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the fall, and the second introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the spring. Studying away can interrupt this sequence and make completing three FL credits by graduation difficult. Students should also be aware that FL courses are not always offered in the summer, and if offered in the summer are subject to cancellation, so they should not rely on the summer for taking FL courses. (Exception: summer study abroad programs.)

Exception: students who wish to study Creole (Kreyol) may fulfill the requirement with either three Creole courses, or with four courses: two courses of Creole and two courses of French.

Elementary Turkish – Fall 2018

Course Number: TURKISH 101

Course Attributes: FL

Course Time: Mon., Wed., & Fri., 10:20am – 11:10am

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Turkish. Placement guidelines.

Didem HavliogluFaculty Biography:

Didem Havlioglu’s research focuses on gender and sexuality in the early modern Ottoman culture production. Didem is particularly interested in women poets and writers and their ways of appropriating the traditional discourse. She has written both in Turkish and English about Ottoman women writers from early modern to Modern periods. Havlioglu’s book project, titled “Mihri Hatun: Performance, Gender-bending and Subversion,” is a study of the first Ottoman woman poet who managed to collect her poetry and achieved an unprecedented success in literary circles of her time. Through her writing, Havlioglu tries to understand the gender structure of Ottoman intellectual history.

 

 

Trinity College of Arts & Science’s Foreign Language Requirement:

The basic requirement is three courses in a given language or a single advanced (300‐)* level course, whichever is attained first.

  • 100 level: Elementary (101–102, or intensive 111, or accelerated 112)
  • 200 level: Intermediate (203–204, or intensive 212, or accelerated 213)
  • 300 level: Advanced

In satisfying the requirement, students may choose one of two options:

  1. Begin a new language at DukeOR
  2. Use their high school or other previous language experience to place into the highest level language course at Duke for which they are qualified.

Students who place into an advanced (300) level course will only have to take one 300‐level FL designated course to satisfy the language requirement. Students who place into the intermediate level will need to take two or three courses (so that their final course is at the advanced [300] level), and students who begin a new language will need to take three courses.

NOTE: These courses must be in the same language. (See Creole exception.) We strongly recommend that students begin their foreign language no later than their sophomore year (preferably by 1st semester). This is especially important for students who will need to take three semesters of a foreign language, who may study away during a fall or spring, and/or who anticipate full course loads that may be inflexible for including foreign language courses later. Students should also be aware that not all departments offer their foreign language courses each semester. This is usually true for Latin, Greek and Asian languages, where the first introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the fall, and the second introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the spring. Studying away can interrupt this sequence and make completing three FL credits by graduation difficult. Students should also be aware that FL courses are not always offered in the summer, and if offered in the summer are subject to cancellation, so they should not rely on the summer for taking FL courses. (Exception: summer study abroad programs.)

Exception: students who wish to study Creole (Kreyol) may fulfill the requirement with either three Creole courses, or with four courses: two courses of Creole and two courses of French.

Intermediate Persian – Fall 2018

Course Number: PERSIAN 203

Course Attributes: FL

Course Time: Mon., Wed., & Fri., 1:40pm – 2:30pm

Course Description:

Introduction to spoken and literary Persian: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Placement guidelines.

Shahla AdelFaculty Biography:

Shahla Adel was born in Tehran, Iran.  Shahla received her B.A. in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from Jundi Shapur (Shahid Chamran) University, Iran, and her M.A. in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from Allameh Tabatabi University, Iran, as well.  Shahla completed her Ph.D. in Foreign Language Education at the University of Texas at Austin, with a concentration on Persian Studies.  Shahla started teaching Persian as a foreign language when she began her studies at the University of Texas at Austin, and has been a teacher of Persian language and culture ever since.  Shahla joined the faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2010, and Duke University in 2017. Her research interests include foreign language pedagogy, second language acquisition, Iranian cultures, and cultures and languages across the curriculum.

Trinity College of Arts & Science’s Foreign Language Requirement:

The basic requirement is three courses in a given language or a single advanced (300‐)* level course, whichever is attained first.

  • 100 level: Elementary (101–102, or intensive 111, or accelerated 112)
  • 200 level: Intermediate (203–204, or intensive 212, or accelerated 213)
  • 300 level: Advanced

In satisfying the requirement, students may choose one of two options:

  1. Begin a new language at DukeOR
  2. Use their high school or other previous language experience to place into the highest level language course at Duke for which they are qualified.

Students who place into an advanced (300) level course will only have to take one 300‐level FL designated course to satisfy the language requirement. Students who place into the intermediate level will need to take two or three courses (so that their final course is at the advanced [300] level), and students who begin a new language will need to take three courses.

NOTE: These courses must be in the same language. (See Creole exception.) We strongly recommend that students begin their foreign language no later than their sophomore year (preferably by 1st semester). This is especially important for students who will need to take three semesters of a foreign language, who may study away during a fall or spring, and/or who anticipate full course loads that may be inflexible for including foreign language courses later. Students should also be aware that not all departments offer their foreign language courses each semester. This is usually true for Latin, Greek and Asian languages, where the first introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the fall, and the second introductory and intermediate courses are scheduled for the spring. Studying away can interrupt this sequence and make completing three FL credits by graduation difficult. Students should also be aware that FL courses are not always offered in the summer, and if offered in the summer are subject to cancellation, so they should not rely on the summer for taking FL courses. (Exception: summer study abroad programs.)

Exception: students who wish to study Creole (Kreyol) may fulfill the requirement with either three Creole courses, or with four courses: two courses of Creole and two courses of French.