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Spring 2017 Awards, Grants, & Scholarships

The Franklin Center’s area studies programs support and administer several awards, grants, and scholarships for Duke undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. Below is a list of opportunities all with upcoming deadlines. Click the links for more information and to apply.

FEBRUARY DEADLINES

This merit-based scholarship supports full-time students in the Duke in China summer program. Preference is given to students demonstrating a strong and sustained interest in Chinese and China Studies as well as those with no other sources of financial aid. 

Faculty needing assistance to cover travel expenses for presenting on East or Southeast Asian topics at conferences and professional meetings may apply for up to $700 from APSI.

Provides graduate students working on international research topics with funding for travel to archival and research sites inside and outside the continental United States, for attendance at specialized conferences, or for foreign language & methods training. Awards range from $500 to $2,500.

Provides funding for full-time Duke undergraduate students to complement their classwork with research experience in different social and cultural settings. On average, DUCIGS makes five awards of up to $2,000 each annually.

With funding provided by the U.S. Department of Education, DUMESC invites undergraduates and graduate students to apply for the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship. The awards provide stipends of $2,500 each plus remission of tuition and registration fees up to $5,000 for one summer session. DUMESC awards FLAS fellowships for the study of Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Urdu.

Full-time graduate and professional school students who are US citizens or permanent residents may apply to engage in language and area studies training on Latin America and Caribbean.  Priority:  Less commonly taught languages. 

MARCH DEADLINES

This program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students who conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. The student’s application must be submitted through the appropriate channels at his/her university, and transmitted to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) by the university’s Project Director.

APSI provides merit-based tuition fellowships to East Asian Studies MA students. All students applying to the program are considered for first-year funding during the application process; no separate application is needed. Students should apply for the second-year award of a $10,000, one-semester grant in the spring semester of their first year.

These awards provide opportunities for Duke undergraduates to complement class work with research experience in Latin America and the Caribbean (includes Puerto Rico and US-Mexico border region).  The awards are open to all fields and subjects.  Approximately 10 awards ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 each will be offered. 

This grant supports student projects with the goal of furthering Asian-American understanding, as well as funding need-based grants for students to study in Asia. Duke undergraduate and graduate students may apply.

Special consideration will be given to projects connected with Asian-American relations, Asian-American cultural or legal issues, and women’s issues, but any project designed to meet a need and which encourages student leadership initiative will be considered.

Limited funding is available to full-time Duke students who plan to go to Japan or Korea to study a language. Priority is given to students who 1) wish to continue language study after finishing Duke University’s language requirement of three semesters, 2) are majoring or minoring in Japanese, Korean, or AMES, and 3) have arranged affiliations with local institutions in Japan or Korea.

The maximum award will be $1500.

The award is not need-based; however, should the recipient be on financial aid, the amount of the scholarship will be used to reduce the self-help portion of the financial aid award. The award is given to the student(s) who best embody the ideals and interests that Sirena held. Preference for the award will be given to students who:

• Are of Asian ancestry, preferably Chinese-American
• Have made a valuable contribution in the area of East-West culture, and
• Have demonstrated academic excellence

Full-time Duke sophomores and juniors may receive up to $2,500 to conduct research in China, Japan or Korea. Priority will be given to students who 1) will conduct research for a senior thesis; 2) whose projects have a high probability of developing into a senior thesis, and 3) who have done some preliminary work and have arranged affiliations with local institutions for the research.

APRIL DEADLINES

Grants of up to $3,000 are given to support research beginning in the summer and concluding by June 30 of the following year. Priority will be given to:

• Junior faculty or those with low/no alternate funding sources

• Faculty needing to travel to conduct East or Southeast Asia research

• Faculty who have not recently received APSI funding

• Faculty who have done conspicuous service for APSI

MAY DEADLINES

APSI annually provides up to $3,000 in funding for research clusters that promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural inquiry and collaboration among East and Southeast Asian studies faculty and students at Duke University and other Triangle area universities.

 

What to Do About Venezuela

On October 27, 2016, Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies Director Patrick Duddy spoke on a panel entitled, “What to Do About Venezuela” as part of the HBO and the Council on Foreign Relations “What to Do About…” series.

Read more here: http://www.cfr.org/venezuela/hbo-do-venezuela/p38427

The video begins at 24.39:

 

Mexican Printmaker to Visit Duke, Durham to Celebrate Day of the Dead

by Jennifer Prather

Sergio Sánchez Santamaría, one of Mexico’s foremost printmakers, will visit Duke and the Durham community Oct. 21-29 to celebrate the Day of the Dead in North Carolina.

Sánchez Santamaría is a muralist, illustrator and printmaker who has taught and exhibited in the United States, Europe and Russia. The Frederic Jameson Gallery in the Friedl Building will display an exhibit of his works, “Printing Realities,” from Oct. 27-Dec. 9. An opening reception is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Sánchez Santamaría will teach at Duke, the Durham School of the Arts and Durham Technical Community College, and will make a limited edition linocut print for Supergraphic, a printmaking studio located in Durham’s Golden Belt complex. He will also create an original mural for the Mural Durham Festival at the Duke Arts Annex, from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22.

read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/10/mexican-printmaker-visit-duke-durham-celebrate-day-dead

 

Indigenous Resistance & Revolution: Mexico and Central America

s17_latamer490
Course Numbers: LATAMER 490S, ROMST 490S, ICS 490S, CULANTH 490S

 

Course code: CCI, EI, CZ, SS

 

Course description:

Interdisciplinary study of geographical, historical, economic, governmental, political, and cultural aspects of modern Latin America and the current issues facing the region.

Instructor: Dr. Irma Alicia Velasquez Nimatuj

Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj is the 2017 Mellon Visiting Professor at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Duke University. She is an indigenous rights activist, journalist, and social anthropologist from Guatemala. She is the first Maya-K’iche’ woman to earn a doctorate in social anthropology and she initiated the court case that made racial discrimination illegal in Guatemala.

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda

by Mitchell Li

Eric Farnswoth Crowd

The audience asks questions of Farnsworth. photo by Catherine Angst

Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies invited Eric Farnsworth, vice president of the Americas Society and Council of the Americas, to speak about the current economic, social, and political state of Latin America and its impact the US.

Latin America has recently seen some positive political change, from the general election held in Argentina in October of last year to the Bolivian constitutional referendum of 2016. Farnsworth expressed his optimism for the region, stating that Latin American voters were moving away from populism and ideology towards pragmatism.

Farnsworth cited Colombia as a model of this trend. For the first time in over 50 years, the president of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, met with the FARC rebels to negotiate a peace deal that would end a half-century long civil war.

These positive political developments led to benefits for Washington as well. “For the first time in many years,” Farnsworth said, “you have leaders—democratically elected—who want to work with the United States to address common challenges.”

Despite a seemingly positive transformation in Latin America’s political scene, the region faces some serious challenges.

Venezuela is in a desperate economic crisis. Drug trafficking is pervading Central America, springing up in permissive environments where law enforcement is inadequate. Nicaragua’s government is working towards ensuring Nicaragua remains a one-party state, and Haiti has struggled to hold a presidential election for months.

“In my view those challenges require the assistance, and some would even say the leadership of the Unites States to help address effectively,” stated Farnsworth. He concluded his brief overview of Latin America’s state with some remarks calling Congress and the incoming president to foster a cooperative atmosphere with Latin America through future foreign policy.

During the moderated discussion that followed, former US Ambassador to Venezuela and director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Patrick Duddy and Farnsworth discussed unaddressed issues raised by the audience: from the deficiencies of education in Latin America to the United States’ antagonistic relationship with Mexico.

Eric Farnsworth’s presentation, “The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington” was sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, as for the Wednesdays at the John Hope Franklin Center series.

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 2

Interethnic Intimacies: Production and Consumption

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S, LIT 415S, CULANTH 415S, AMI 415S, VMS 415S, ICS 415S

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ) Gateway course for the Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The class examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar version of this course.

 

Surviving Globalization: The Global South and the Development Imagination

with Professor Michaeline Crichlow

LATAMER 409, AAAS 409, SOCIOL 409, ICS 409, CULANTH 409

(CCI, EI, SS)

Global Change entails a multiplicity of environmental, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that create challenges for development. The Global South, a vital area of the world, has been entangled in this vortex of global change as both catalyst and conductor of an emergent globalizing modernity. The progress of globalization seems beset by multiple stressors, ranging from financial crises and global recession, to climate change, state and non-state conflicts, free ranging terrorist aggression, and global health scares. What are the odds then of surviving globalization? What role do our imaginations of development play in either creating crises or effectively responding to them?

 

Islam in the Americas

with Professor Mona Hassan

RELIGION 384S, HISTORY 351S, AAAS 274S, AMES 230S

(CCI, W, CZ, SS)

Explores how Muslim communities live and practice Islam in the American context. Examines diverse Muslim communities emerging from transatlantic exploration, trade in slaves, and migration as well as indigenous conversion. Discussion of religious and cultural identities of American Muslim peoples and consideration of questions of communal organization, religious authority, gender dynamics, youth culture, political and civic engagement, as well as American Muslim comedy and entertainment. This course examines the impact of 9/11 upon American Muslims, their responses to the tragedy, and Americans’ shifting perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

 

Fall 2016 Feature Courses, part 1

QUEER CHINA

with Professor Carlos Rojas

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 439, AMI 439, CULANTH 439, LIT 439, VMS 439, WOMENST 439

This course examines queer discourse, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. This course focuses on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but also considers a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials.

 

WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

AMES 471, AMI 256, CULANTH 255, LIT 212, VMS 234

The WORLD OF KOREAN CINEMA broadly defines national, generic, and theoretical boundaries, beyond conventional auteur, genre, one-way influence, and national cinema theories. This course also examines cinematic texts in local, regional, and global contexts and intersections. This course covers variable topics based in theoretical and political discourses on gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, global flows of people and cultures, and popular and “high” culture crossovers, traditional co-productions, remakes, translations and retellings. Previous knowledge of Korean language and culture is not required.

 

MIDDLE EAST AND LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Ellen McLarney 

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 375S, LATAMER 375S
This course will look at how Middle Eastern identities blend with Latin American ones, through migration, institutions, popular media, transnational political ideologies (Marxist, leftist, socialist, populist, nationalist, religious, or feminist), as well as through conversions and proselytizing. Solidarities across the Global South central to Latin American projects to “decolonize the mind,” to mutually inspired “liberation theologies,”, and to new kinds of non-Western feminisms will be covered. This course explores the creative conjuncture of Middle Eastern and Latin American politics and cultures, through immigration and assimilation, institution building, political activism, media production, feminism, and conversion.

CONTEMPORARY TURKISH COMPOSITION AND READINGS

with Professor Erdağ Göknar

(CCI, FL) Prerequisite – Turkish 70

Advanced grammar and syntax with intense composition component. Analytical readings in the original. Prerequisite: Turkish 70 or equivalent.

 

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA

with Professor Jocelyn Olcott


(CCI, CZ) – Gateway for Undergraduate Latin American and Caribbean Studies Certificate

LATAMER 230, HISTORY 330, ICS 327

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the peoples, cultures, and burning issues of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a required course for students seeking the certificate in Latin American Studies.

 

 

Venezuela: New Political Realities, Continuing Challenges

Ambassador Patrick Duddy will present his thoughts on the 2015 Venezuela parliamentary elections during the Wednesdays at the Center series on February 10, 2016 from 12:00pm – 1:00pm.

On December 6, 2015, Venezuela held its first parliamentary elections since the death of President Hugo Chávez. The incumbent party, The United Socialist Party of Venezuela, was voted out of power as the Democratic Unity Roundtable took the majority of seats and over 56% of the popular vote.

Duddy served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela from 2007-2010 under both President Bush and President Obama. At his retirement Ambassador Duddy was one of the Department of State’s most senior Latin American specialists with exceptionally broad experience in trade, energy, public affairs and crisis management.

 

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