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Spring 2017 Awards, Grants, & Scholarships

The Franklin Center’s area studies programs support and administer several awards, grants, and scholarships for Duke undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. Below is a list of opportunities all with upcoming deadlines. Click the links for more information and to apply.

FEBRUARY DEADLINES

This merit-based scholarship supports full-time students in the Duke in China summer program. Preference is given to students demonstrating a strong and sustained interest in Chinese and China Studies as well as those with no other sources of financial aid. 

Faculty needing assistance to cover travel expenses for presenting on East or Southeast Asian topics at conferences and professional meetings may apply for up to $700 from APSI.

Provides graduate students working on international research topics with funding for travel to archival and research sites inside and outside the continental United States, for attendance at specialized conferences, or for foreign language & methods training. Awards range from $500 to $2,500.

Provides funding for full-time Duke undergraduate students to complement their classwork with research experience in different social and cultural settings. On average, DUCIGS makes five awards of up to $2,000 each annually.

With funding provided by the U.S. Department of Education, DUMESC invites undergraduates and graduate students to apply for the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship. The awards provide stipends of $2,500 each plus remission of tuition and registration fees up to $5,000 for one summer session. DUMESC awards FLAS fellowships for the study of Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Urdu.

Full-time graduate and professional school students who are US citizens or permanent residents may apply to engage in language and area studies training on Latin America and Caribbean.  Priority:  Less commonly taught languages. 

MARCH DEADLINES

This program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students who conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. The student’s application must be submitted through the appropriate channels at his/her university, and transmitted to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) by the university’s Project Director.

APSI provides merit-based tuition fellowships to East Asian Studies MA students. All students applying to the program are considered for first-year funding during the application process; no separate application is needed. Students should apply for the second-year award of a $10,000, one-semester grant in the spring semester of their first year.

These awards provide opportunities for Duke undergraduates to complement class work with research experience in Latin America and the Caribbean (includes Puerto Rico and US-Mexico border region).  The awards are open to all fields and subjects.  Approximately 10 awards ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 each will be offered. 

This grant supports student projects with the goal of furthering Asian-American understanding, as well as funding need-based grants for students to study in Asia. Duke undergraduate and graduate students may apply.

Special consideration will be given to projects connected with Asian-American relations, Asian-American cultural or legal issues, and women’s issues, but any project designed to meet a need and which encourages student leadership initiative will be considered.

Limited funding is available to full-time Duke students who plan to go to Japan or Korea to study a language. Priority is given to students who 1) wish to continue language study after finishing Duke University’s language requirement of three semesters, 2) are majoring or minoring in Japanese, Korean, or AMES, and 3) have arranged affiliations with local institutions in Japan or Korea.

The maximum award will be $1500.

The award is not need-based; however, should the recipient be on financial aid, the amount of the scholarship will be used to reduce the self-help portion of the financial aid award. The award is given to the student(s) who best embody the ideals and interests that Sirena held. Preference for the award will be given to students who:

• Are of Asian ancestry, preferably Chinese-American
• Have made a valuable contribution in the area of East-West culture, and
• Have demonstrated academic excellence

Full-time Duke sophomores and juniors may receive up to $2,500 to conduct research in China, Japan or Korea. Priority will be given to students who 1) will conduct research for a senior thesis; 2) whose projects have a high probability of developing into a senior thesis, and 3) who have done some preliminary work and have arranged affiliations with local institutions for the research.

APRIL DEADLINES

Grants of up to $3,000 are given to support research beginning in the summer and concluding by June 30 of the following year. Priority will be given to:

• Junior faculty or those with low/no alternate funding sources

• Faculty needing to travel to conduct East or Southeast Asia research

• Faculty who have not recently received APSI funding

• Faculty who have done conspicuous service for APSI

MAY DEADLINES

APSI annually provides up to $3,000 in funding for research clusters that promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural inquiry and collaboration among East and Southeast Asian studies faculty and students at Duke University and other Triangle area universities.

 

Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship

The U.S Department of Education designed the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship to provide students the opportunity for intense language study in a modern foreign language, and international and area studies .

Duke University’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Middle East Studies Center are both offering FLAS fellowships this summer and next academic year. Both centers are hosting a FLAS information session on January 21, 2016 from 5:00pm – 6:30pm at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, room 240.

More information and deadline information:
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Middle East Studies Center

 

Watch former Duke FLAS fellows discuss their fellowships:

Memonèt: Teaching Creole on YouTube

This past year Duke University lecture Jacques Pierre and his students collaborated with the John Hope Franklin Center to develop online video teaching tools for Haitian Creole. Pierre’s series of memonèt (Creole for riddles) feature Haitian culture, history, geography, proverbs, and food.

Pierre has been teaching Haitian Creole in Duke University’s Romance Studies Department since 2010. In 2014, Duke expanded its Creole offering through Cisco’s Telepresence virtual classroom. With the help of the virtual classroom, Pierre teaches students both Duke University students and students from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, the University of Virginia, and Vanderbilt University. Now with the creation of his YouTube videos, Pierre is teaching students around the world.

 

photo by Michelle Walz. Creative Commons license