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Screening the Holocaust: Jews, WWII, and World Cinema

s17_ames341Course numbers: AMES 341A, AMI 263S, JEWISHST 266S, LIT 263S

 

Course codes: CCI, EI, ALP, CZ

 

Course description:

Screening the Holocaust surveys WWII and Jewish Holocaust films from Europe, the United States, and Israel. The course explores divergent cinematic strategies employed to represent what is commonly deemed as “beyond representation”. The class will examine the heated debate spurred by a number of Holocaust films.

Instructor: Dr. Shai Ginsburg

Dr. Ginsburg is the Director of Undergraduate Studies at Duke University’s Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Department. Dr. Ginsburg’s research interests include Hebrew literature, Israeli cinema, critical theory, film theory, and nationalism.  His book, Rhetoric and Nation: The Formation of Hebrew National Culture, 1880-1990 (Syracuse University Press) was released in 2014.

Leonor Leal’s Contemporary Flamenco

On March 23rd, Leonor Leal gave a casual performance during a lecture on “The Art of Contemporary Flamenco” at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Wednesdays at the Center series. Leal was accompanied by guitarist, Jose Lois Rodriguez and vocalist/cajón player, Francisco “Yiyi” Orozco. All three of the artist have training in classical Flamenco, but now perform with more modern interpretation of the movement and music.

During the presentation, Leal touched on the international aspects of Flamenco which borrows motifs from Arab, African, and South American cultures. Leal playfully unpacked traditional Flamenco movements for the audience at the Franklin Center explaining the difference in postures from Tango and Flamenco.

Leal’s visit to Duke University was part of a 3-day residency supported by the Duke Dance Program, Spanish Studies, and the Program in Women’s Studies. Aside from her lecture at the Franklin Center, Leal also gave a public demonstration and held a master class in the Ark Dance Studio during the residency.

Refugee Lives

Gulwali Passarlay

Gulwali Passarlay speaks to Duke undergrads.

On January 21, the Duke University undergraduate students in the Refugee Lives: Violence, Culture and Identity class, co-taught by miriam cooke, Maha Houssami, and Nancy Kalow, welcomed special guest Gulwali Passerlay via Skype from the United Kingdom (UK). Passerlay recently co-author The Lightless Sky (Harper Collins Publishers, 2016) which tells his harrowing one-year journey as a refugee from Afghanistan to the UK when he was just 12 years old. The now 21 year old Passerlay studies at the University of Manchester, and shared stories with the class about his travels through Iran, Turkey, Greece, Italy, and France, including the smugglers good and bad, safe-houses, prison, refugee camps, and the friends he made along the way.

Refugee Lives: Violence, Culture and Identity examines how writers, artists, and filmmakers represent the ways in which Afghans, Palestinians, Syrians, Iraqis, Sudanese and Egyptians become refugees and their adaptation strategies to new, harsh circumstances both in and outside the Arab world. The course discusses government and non-governmental organizations that have worked with Arab refugees since 1948 and explores the role played by refugees in constructing national identity and consciousness. Refugee Lives is cross listed in the department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and the Center for Documentary Studies.

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