Posts

Mexican Printmaker to Visit Duke, Durham to Celebrate Day of the Dead

by Jennifer Prather

Sergio Sánchez Santamaría, one of Mexico’s foremost printmakers, will visit Duke and the Durham community Oct. 21-29 to celebrate the Day of the Dead in North Carolina.

Sánchez Santamaría is a muralist, illustrator and printmaker who has taught and exhibited in the United States, Europe and Russia. The Frederic Jameson Gallery in the Friedl Building will display an exhibit of his works, “Printing Realities,” from Oct. 27-Dec. 9. An opening reception is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Sánchez Santamaría will teach at Duke, the Durham School of the Arts and Durham Technical Community College, and will make a limited edition linocut print for Supergraphic, a printmaking studio located in Durham’s Golden Belt complex. He will also create an original mural for the Mural Durham Festival at the Duke Arts Annex, from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22.

read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/10/mexican-printmaker-visit-duke-durham-celebrate-day-dead

 

Poetic Cinema

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S
Course codes: CCI, ALP, CZ
Course description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Instructor: Professor Satti Khanna

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

Fazil Say visits Duke

In February 2016, Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say visited Duke University as part of the Duke Performances’ artist-in-residence program. During his stay, Say preformed a sold out show, led a student chamber music intensive, met with the Turkish student association, and spoke on a public panel about music and culture in Turkey.

Erdağ Göknar, the director of the Middle East Studies Center, sat down with Say to discuss how Say’s work acts as a bridge between traditional Anatolian folk music and today’s modern Turkish compositions. Göknar and Say also discuss the idea of music as resistance.

Say’s residency was made possible, in part, with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with support from Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina (ATA-NC).

More about the artist:

Fazil Say’s Website

Fazil Say’s Facebook

 

Leonor Leal’s Contemporary Flamenco

On March 23rd, Leonor Leal gave a casual performance during a lecture on “The Art of Contemporary Flamenco” at the John Hope Franklin Center’s Wednesdays at the Center series. Leal was accompanied by guitarist, Jose Lois Rodriguez and vocalist/cajón player, Francisco “Yiyi” Orozco. All three of the artist have training in classical Flamenco, but now perform with more modern interpretation of the movement and music.

During the presentation, Leal touched on the international aspects of Flamenco which borrows motifs from Arab, African, and South American cultures. Leal playfully unpacked traditional Flamenco movements for the audience at the Franklin Center explaining the difference in postures from Tango and Flamenco.

Leal’s visit to Duke University was part of a 3-day residency supported by the Duke Dance Program, Spanish Studies, and the Program in Women’s Studies. Aside from her lecture at the Franklin Center, Leal also gave a public demonstration and held a master class in the Ark Dance Studio during the residency.

One Rwanda: Portraits of Contemporary Life

Bill Bamberger, Sewing class in the children's village of Kigarama

Bill Bamberger, Sewing class in the children’s village of Kigarama

Exhibiting:  March 7, 2016 – August 5, 2016


Exhibition Statement

On the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide, photographer Bill Bamberger traveled throughout the country to photograph the daily lives of the Rwandese people.

Like most documentarians visiting Rwanda at this historic time, Bamberger went there with plans to undertake a post-genocide project: to photograph children who had grown up parentless as a result of the genocide and were now raising families of their own.

But as Bamberger began to get to know the country and people, the focus of his project shifted. Over the course of three months, he journeyed by bus around Rwanda, meeting with Rwandese and international volunteers. During this time, he visited health clinics in Kigali’s poorest neighborhoods, schools in remote mountain villages, an orphanage on the banks of Lake Kivu, tea fields in the south, sugar cane fields in the north, national parks on the borders of the country and tennis clubs in Kigali’s most affluent neighborhoods.

Struck by the warmth, humanity, and collective resilience of the people as they sought to forge a new national identity, Bamberger stopped thinking about the Rwandese primarily as Hutus or Tutsis, or as perpetrators or survivors, as the international media most often portrayed them.

Instead, his photographs explore how the people of Rwanda are finding their way while faced with modern-day issues like healthcare, education and housing. We get a glimpse of how people are living side-by-side in ‘one Rwanda’, the government’s catchphrase for a country trying to put itself back together, 20 years after the genocide.

In the tradition of German photographer August Sander—whose landmark publication Face of Our Time depicted a diverse cross-section of society during the Weimer Republic—Bamberger’s portraits reveal the modern-day face of Rwanda and include: farmers, shopkeepers, taxi drivers, security guards, country club members, construction workers and orphaned children.

 

Biography

 

Bill Bamberger’s work explores large social issues of our time: the demise of the American factory, housing in America, and adolescents coming of age in an inner-city high school.  His first book, Closing: The Life and Death of an American Factory won the Mayflower Prize in Non-Fiction and was a semifinalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award.  His photographs have appeared in Aperture, Doubletake, Harper’s and the New York Times Magazine.  He has had one-person exhibitions at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution, the North Carolina Museum of Art and the National Building Museum.  A trademark of Bamberger’s photography is that it is first shown in the neighborhood where it was created, prior to its museum exhibition.

Supported by the Power – Lonnie Holley

Exhibiting in the John Hope Franklin Gallery from December 15, 2015 – February 26, 2016.

 

Lonnie Holley is the artist working today who can best eliminate the barrier between taught and untaught art. This collapse of dividers, not unlike racial ones, represents a declassification or deconstruction of a deeply troubling history in order to create a more communitarian future.

Holley is a peerless artist who we best label contemporary, not folk. His sense of contemporary is more closely aligned with current social and political events than most contemporary artists who seem to have only evolved their use of materials.

In Lonnie Holley: Supported by the Power, sculptures emerge from Alabama yards and Atlanta corners. Holley’s themes in his art and music run concurrent to contemporary actualities: post-Jim Crow race pathologies or a recycling of consumer goods towards a more sustainable future.   His story is a southern tale. The history of the South conjures the most American of stories: a story of oppression from tilled fields and small yards to urban corners of southern and northern cities.

Holley, when compared to an exemplary artist like Robert Rauschenberg, creates works which are more zen-like, less neurotic and contradictory and more future-predictive in terms of 1/ connecting to tradition 2/ a recycling of materials to make a more sustainable art 3/ creating works with fewer conservation problems as they are already time-rendered 4/ its connection to music 5/ creating a language of liberation 6/ the connection to nature and local specificities.

On the main wall we see four totemic, cruciform-like works which convey the African-American exigency of forced labor, suffering and the genesis of religious sanctuary.   On the end wall, Never to be Opened Again, made by Holley in post-Katrina New Orleans, depicts a local history in ruins, a result of the baneful mix of a corrupted nature and politics.   In the two remaining works, Supported by the Power and The Catholic Ladies’ Picture, Holley creates a personal history (auto-portraiture as empowerment) and a conceptual nod to art history (art objects as carriers of power). Supported by the Power, consisting solely of 7 sculptures, we can still grasp the sum power of Lonnie Holley’s work.

Special thanks are due to: the artist, Matt and William Arnett, Bradford Cox, Rodney and Nancy Gould, MA, Joan and Michael Salke, MA, Jason Doty, Giovanni Zanalda and Lauren Feilich.

Events

Creative Memory

The Creative Memory of the Syrian Revolution

An exhibition curated by Sana Yazigi, creativememory.org

 

by Sana Yazigi, October 2016

In July 2015, two pieces of graffiti appeared on a wall in the besieged district of Al-Waer, in the city of Homs: “One day, we’ll be what we want to be. The journey hasn’t begun and the road is not finished” and “I’m here, this is my trace, a moon will emerge from the darkness.”

With these words of hope from the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwich, Syrian men and women are resisting suffering and death, as they aspire to a better future.

The Syrians have become invisible, hidden by the media, who only talk about the fight against radical Islamists, but never about the democratic motivations of the people.

It is as if in Syria there were only Bashar Asad and Daesh, as if individual Syrians did not exist, as if they were not resisting, not loving and not demanding their right

Creative Memory follows the tracks and traces that Syrian artist-activists have left: graffiti, drawings, poetry, photographs, sculptures, paintings, caricatures… Today the site features over 24,000 items in three languages and 22 categories classified according to the date and place of creation and the names of their authors.

The website brings together works from the Syrian revolution and provides information about each one. We look at how people have given expression to their political, economic and social demands. We study their creations in order to preserve the memory of Syrian creative expression from the beginning of the Revolution in 2011 until today.

With simple but meaningful words and images, Syrians have cried out, but their demands have been forgotten and their causes abandoned. This is why we created this site. To resist amnesia. To support the Syrian cause. To pay homage to all those who have embodied, in their actions, a historic change.

We present these works to those who know all about the situation in Syria but also to those who know nothing. We go out of our way to give Syrians pride of place and to highlight the subjectivity of individuals. They must be made visible, so that the whole world should recognise them, so that their cause shouldn’t die. And this faith is the foundation of hope.

This exhibition was commissioned by Festival International des Arts de Bordeaux Métropole (FAB). Produced by the FAB (Bordeaux, France), supported by Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez (Bordeaux, France), coproduced by Scène Nationale Tandem (Arras-Douai, France). First presented in October 2016 during the FAB.

 

Iraqi Pioneer Art

Speaker: Dr. Nedda Ibrahim
 
The Iraqi Pioneer Art era began in the 1930s and flourished throughout the mid-century until its abrupt end in the 1990s. Dr. Ibrahim’s presentation will introduce the main pioneer artists of the movement, focus on the Iraqi diaspora’s artists, and on the impact of the current political situation towards the future of Iraq’s cultural heritage.
Dr. Ibrahim’s grandfather, Mohammed Saleh Zeki, and uncle, Zaid Saleh Zeki, were both active in the Iraqi Pioneer art movement and instrumental in advancing the art of a past modern Iraq. Dr. Ibrahim’s late brother, Robert Kaye Ibrahim, and her son, Sami Drabick, have carried on the family tradition, exhibiting art throughout North Carolina. Dr. Ibrahim is a dentist by profession with a practice in Raleigh, NC. She teaches in the Department of Operative Dentistry at the University of North Carolina’s School of Dentistry. Dr. Ibrahim is the founder of Mariam Dental Clinic, and is involved with Wake Smiles, both clinics serving those in need. She is the co-president of the NC Chapter of the American Association of Women Dentists and is the former president of the Raleigh Wake County Dental Society. In the spring of 2016, Dr. Ibrahim organized the Iraqi Refugee Art Exhibit at William Peace University.
 
This presentation is sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. A light lunch will be served. Parking is available in nearby Trent Rd. and Erwin Rd. parking decks. The series provides 1 hour parking vouchers to guests.

Creative Memory Gallery Opening

The Creative Memory of the Syrian Revolution

An exhibition curated by Sana Yazigi, creativememory.org

 

 

by Sana Yazigi, October 2016

In July 2015, two pieces of graffiti appeared on a wall in the besieged district of Al-Waer, in the city of Homs: “One day, we’ll be what we want to be. The journey hasn’t begun and the road is not finished” and “I’m here, this is my trace, a moon will emerge from the darkness.”

With these words of hope from the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwich, Syrian men and women are resisting suffering and death, as they aspire to a better future.

The Syrians have become invisible, hidden by the media, who only talk about the fight against radical Islamists, but never about the democratic motivations of the people.

It is as if in Syria there were only Bashar Asad and Daesh, as if individual Syrians did not exist, as if they were not resisting, not loving and not demanding their right

Creative Memory follows the tracks and traces that Syrian artist-activists have left: graffiti, drawings, poetry, photographs, sculptures, paintings, caricatures… Today the site features over 24,000 items in three languages and 22 categories classified according to the date and place of creation and the names of their authors.

The website brings together works from the Syrian revolution and provides information about each one. We look at how people have given expression to their political, economic and social demands. We study their creations in order to preserve the memory of Syrian creative expression from the beginning of the Revolution in 2011 until today.

With simple but meaningful words and images, Syrians have cried out, but their demands have been forgotten and their causes abandoned. This is why we created this site. To resist amnesia. To support the Syrian cause. To pay homage to all those who have embodied, in their actions, a historic change.

We present these works to those who know all about the situation in Syria but also to those who know nothing. We go out of our way to give Syrians pride of place and to highlight the subjectivity of individuals. They must be made visible, so that the whole world should recognise them, so that their cause shouldn’t die. And this faith is the foundation of hope.

This exhibition was commissioned by Festival International des Arts de Bordeaux Métropole (FAB). Produced by the FAB (Bordeaux, France), supported by Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez (Bordeaux, France), coproduced by Scène Nationale Tandem (Arras-Douai, France). First presented in October 2016 during the FAB.