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Trump in the Age of Captain America

As part of the Wednesday at the Center series, the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies welcomed Professor Jason Dittmer to speak about President Trump’s populism in the context of Captain America.

 

Duke welcomed Professor Jason Dittmer to discuss the unexpected relationship between Captain America and President Trump on February 15, 2017. Dittmer is a Professor in the Department of Geography at the University College London.

 

Dittmer speaks at Duke

The John Hope Franklin Center and the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies hosted the packed event which focused on Trump’s populism, power, and sforeign policy in relation to the wildly popular Captain America comics and movies. Professor Dittmer discussed the theory that President Trump is the embodiment of American New Populism and masculinity, similarly to how Captain America is portrayed.

 

Dittmer compared the politics of Captain America with the politics of President Trump, noting that citizens of both the right and left have used Captain America to advance and undermine President Trump’s rhetoric and policies.  Dittmer went on to say, “We have this notion of [Trump] as a superhero or as someone who needs to be fought by super heroic action.”

 

During his visit, Dittmer also gave a lecture entitled “The UK in the World/the World in the UK” which featured research from his forthcoming book, “Diplomatic Material: Affect, Assemblage, and Foreign Policy” (Duke University Press, 2017).

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 2

Interethnic Intimacies: Production and Consumption

with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S, LIT 415S, CULANTH 415S, AMI 415S, VMS 415S, ICS 415S

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ) Gateway course for the Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The class examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar version of this course.

 

Surviving Globalization: The Global South and the Development Imagination

with Professor Michaeline Crichlow

LATAMER 409, AAAS 409, SOCIOL 409, ICS 409, CULANTH 409

(CCI, EI, SS)

Global Change entails a multiplicity of environmental, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that create challenges for development. The Global South, a vital area of the world, has been entangled in this vortex of global change as both catalyst and conductor of an emergent globalizing modernity. The progress of globalization seems beset by multiple stressors, ranging from financial crises and global recession, to climate change, state and non-state conflicts, free ranging terrorist aggression, and global health scares. What are the odds then of surviving globalization? What role do our imaginations of development play in either creating crises or effectively responding to them?

 

Islam in the Americas

with Professor Mona Hassan

RELIGION 384S, HISTORY 351S, AAAS 274S, AMES 230S

(CCI, W, CZ, SS)

Explores how Muslim communities live and practice Islam in the American context. Examines diverse Muslim communities emerging from transatlantic exploration, trade in slaves, and migration as well as indigenous conversion. Discussion of religious and cultural identities of American Muslim peoples and consideration of questions of communal organization, religious authority, gender dynamics, youth culture, political and civic engagement, as well as American Muslim comedy and entertainment. This course examines the impact of 9/11 upon American Muslims, their responses to the tragedy, and Americans’ shifting perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

 

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