Culture and Environment in Modern Chinese History

s17_history514Course number: HISTORY 514S
Course codes: CCI, EI, STS, CZ, SS
Course description:

This course is an examination of the changing patterns through which the physical environment and culture are mutually formed in late imperial and modern China. Culture includes the creation of cosmological and social ideas as well as the long-term practices of settlement and utilization of the environment. In what ways did cultures represent limits to environmental exploitation? Special attention will be given to how communities and the state respond to environmental disasters and explore the feedback loops for protection and prevention. This course explores the importance of long-term understanding for the current environmental crisis in China.

Instructor: Professor Prasenjit Duara

Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. He was born and educated in India and received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was previously Professor and Chair of the Dept of History and Chair of the Committee on Chinese Studies at the University of Chicago (1991-2008). Subsequently, he became Raffles Professor of Humanities and Director, Asia Research Institute at National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

In 1988, he published Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) which won the Fairbank Prize of the AHA and the Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA. Among his other books are Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and most recently, The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014). He has edited Decolonization: Now and Then (Routledge, 2004) and co-edited A Companion to Global Historical Thought with Viren Murthy and Andrew Sartori (John Wiley, 2014). His work has been widely translated into Chinese, Japanese, Korean and the European languages.

Poetic Cinema

Course numbers: AMES 311S, VMS 354S, AMI 266S, ICS 311S
Course codes: CCI, ALP, CZ
Course description:

Poetic Cinema will inquire into sources of “resonance” in international cinema with emphasis on films from Asia and the Middle East. The object of the course is to describe aspects of film construction which conduce to intense experience for viewers. Readings in delve into indigenous aesthetics.

Instructor: Professor Satti Khanna

Professor Khanna interprets the lives and works of contemporary Indian writers to an international audience through a series of documentary films and translations. His recent work includes a translation of Vinod Kumar Shukla’s Naukar ki Kameez (The Servant’s Shirt, Penguin India, 1999), an anthology of short fiction, His Daily Bread (Har Anand, 2000) and the series Literary Postcard on the Doordarshan national network in India.

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda

by Mitchell Li

Eric Farnswoth Crowd

The audience asks questions of Farnsworth. photo by Catherine Angst

Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies invited Eric Farnsworth, vice president of the Americas Society and Council of the Americas, to speak about the current economic, social, and political state of Latin America and its impact the US.

Latin America has recently seen some positive political change, from the general election held in Argentina in October of last year to the Bolivian constitutional referendum of 2016. Farnsworth expressed his optimism for the region, stating that Latin American voters were moving away from populism and ideology towards pragmatism.

Farnsworth cited Colombia as a model of this trend. For the first time in over 50 years, the president of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, met with the FARC rebels to negotiate a peace deal that would end a half-century long civil war.

These positive political developments led to benefits for Washington as well. “For the first time in many years,” Farnsworth said, “you have leaders—democratically elected—who want to work with the United States to address common challenges.”

Despite a seemingly positive transformation in Latin America’s political scene, the region faces some serious challenges.

Venezuela is in a desperate economic crisis. Drug trafficking is pervading Central America, springing up in permissive environments where law enforcement is inadequate. Nicaragua’s government is working towards ensuring Nicaragua remains a one-party state, and Haiti has struggled to hold a presidential election for months.

“In my view those challenges require the assistance, and some would even say the leadership of the Unites States to help address effectively,” stated Farnsworth. He concluded his brief overview of Latin America’s state with some remarks calling Congress and the incoming president to foster a cooperative atmosphere with Latin America through future foreign policy.

During the moderated discussion that followed, former US Ambassador to Venezuela and director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Patrick Duddy and Farnsworth discussed unaddressed issues raised by the audience: from the deficiencies of education in Latin America to the United States’ antagonistic relationship with Mexico.

Eric Farnsworth’s presentation, “The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington” was sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, as for the Wednesdays at the John Hope Franklin Center series.

Manno Charlemagne performs at Duke

by Catherine Angst

“Òganizasyon mondyal yo pa pou nou yo ye…” Manno Charlemagne voice reverberates through Duke’s Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall in his native Haitian Creole. Charlemagne’s velvet vocals harmonize with his acoustic guitar as he repeats to the large crowd, “Òganizasyon mondyal yo pa pou nou yo ye…” a message that translates roughly as, “Global organizations are not in our interest”.

As a singer and songwriter, Charlemagne’s politically charged chansons have scored the soundtrack of Haiti’s political protest for over 30 years. Born in the suburbs of Port-au-Prince in 1948, Charlemagne music was influenced by traditional Haitian twoubadou performers and shaped by the “kilti libète” or freedom culture movement of 1970s Haiti. Throughout the 1980s, Charlemagne’s songs stood in opposition to and captured the injustice of the Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier regime.

Jacques Pierre, co-director of Duke’s Haiti Lab, coordinated the Charlemagne concert. In addition to directing the Haiti Lab, Pierre teaches Haitian Creole in Duke’s Romance Studies Department.  “I wanted to bring Manno to campus because my Intermediate Creole students are working with his songs. Also, I wanted to share his performance with the Haitian community in the Triangle area, so they could reconnect with many of his songs from the 1980s and 90s which are still very powerful and moving,” said Pierre.

As an ambassador of Haitian culture on campus, Pierre coordinates several Haitian events throughout the year including the upcoming International Haitian Creole Day on October 28th, and an Haitian film festival which takes place in the spring.  Pierre’s students, Duke faculty, and members of the Haitian diaspora filled the audience on September 23rd to listen to Charlemagne’s sharp lyrics, enjoy the Haitian rhythms, and reflect on the importance that art and music can have in political histories.

 

video by Jennifer Prather

 

The Manno Charlemagne concert was supported by Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the department of African and African American Studies, Duke’s Center for International and Global Studies, the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Franklin Humanities Institute, the Haiti Lab, and the department of Romance Studies.

Middle East Explained

The Duke-UNC Consortium for the Middle East Studies recently launched a new video series, “Middle East Explained” aimed to provide digital teaching tools for middle and high school teachers. Emma Harver, the Consortium for the Middle East Studies Program and Outreach Coordinator, conceived of the video series after surveying a group of North Carolina educators about teaching the Middle East last spring.

“71% (of the educators surveyed) said they would likely teach more about the Middle East if they has more resources,” said Harver. The digital pedagogy project plans to provide free, creditable, expert teaching modules with each 5-10 minute video packaged with a downloadable guides for both teachers and students. The Middle East Explained premiered its first video, “The Historical Roots of the Syrian Refugee Crisis” on September 7, 2016. In the video, Dr. miriam cooke, the Braxton Craven Professor Arab Cultures at Duke University, provides the historical context key to understanding why so many Syrians have fled their homes.

Harver plans to create more “Middle East Explained” modules throughout the academic year that align with the North Carolina curriculum. The series intends to develop modules on the Iraq War, the Sykes-Picot agreement, the Arab Spring, and more. “My hope is that this project will deepen understanding of this important region in an approachable manner by sharing the expertise of the Duke and UNC with the greater North Carolina community,” said Harver.

The Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, founded in 2005, is a collaboration between the Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the Carolina Center for the Studies of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations at the University of North Carolina. The “Middle East Explained” project is made possible by the support of the John Hope Franklin Center and a Title VI grant from the United States Department of Education.

 

Will ‘Hamilton’ change how actors of color are cast?

By Camille Jackson

Theater-goers trying to figure out the surprising success of the musical “Hamilton,” which casts actors of color in the role of the founding fathers, should start with one particular reason, say two leading observers of musical theater: its hip hop soundtrack.

“Broadway musicals are supposed to produce hits. When rock took over it became popular music. When hip hop and rap took over, it became popular but [before Hamilton] there were no hip-hop musicals,” said William Henry Curry, the resident conductor for the NC Symphony.

Read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/09/will-hamilton-change-how-actors-color-are-cast

Wednesday at the Center – Fall 2016

Wednesdays at the Center (W@TC) is a topical weekly series in which scholars, artists, journalists, and others speak informally about their work in conversation with the audience. The series is organized and presented by the John Hope Franklin Center with the support of partner organizations. All events in the series are free and open to the public. A light lunch is served at each event and an one hour parking voucher given to attendees.

September 7, 2016

Hamilton and Malcolm X: Radical Race Representation in Opera and Musical Theatre

Speakers: William Henry Curry, Durham Symphony Music Director and Raleigh Medal of the Arts Recipient; and Jackson Cooper, Classical Music and Theatre Critic for Classical Voice of North Carolina and the Greensboro News and Record

September 14, 2016

Whither Austria? Whither Europe? The Austrian Elections, Brexit, and the European Future

Speaker: Erhard Busek, President of the Vienna Economic Forum

September 21, 2016

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington

Speaker: Eric Farnsworth, Vice President of the Council of the Americas

September 28, 2016

What Duke’s collections can do for you; or, what is it we collect?

Speaker: Sean Swanick, Middle East and Islamic Studies Librarian, Duke University

October 5, 2016

The sacred and the healing potential in Ancient Oriental Music & Movement Therapy

Speaker: Dr. Oruc Guvenc, Turkish Music Therapist

October 19 2016

Adolescent HIV: How to Break the Mortality Wave

Speaker: Dr. Dorothy Dow, Duke Global Health Institute

October 26, 2016

From Isolation to Open-Access: Painting Myanmar in the 21st Century

Speaker: Catherine Raymond, Director of the Center for Norman Studies at Northern Illinois University

November 2, 2016

The Political Consequences of Terrorism

Speakers: Laia Balcells, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Duke University

November 9, 2016

The Crucible: From Politics to Process

Speaker: Mark Perry, Dramaturg of THE CRUCIBLE; 

Ray Dooley, Actor, playing Giles Corey in THE CRUCIBLE

Jeffrey Blair Cornell, Actor, playing  Deputy Governor Danforth in THE CRUCIBLE

Jules Odendahl-James, Director of Academic Engagement, Humanities, Duke University

November 16, 2016

Cuba and U.S. Relations: One Year Later

Speaker: Joan Perkins, Deputy Director, Office of Cuban Affairs, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, U.S. Department of State

November 30, 2016

 The Koran in English: A Biography

Speaker: Bruce Lawrence, Emeritus, Duke University

December 7, 2016

Global Graduate Working Groups

Speakers: 2016-2017 Duke University Center for International and Global Studies’ Graduate Working Groups

Fazil Say visits Duke

In February 2016, Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say visited Duke University as part of the Duke Performances’ artist-in-residence program. During his stay, Say preformed a sold out show, led a student chamber music intensive, met with the Turkish student association, and spoke on a public panel about music and culture in Turkey.

Erdağ Göknar, the director of the Middle East Studies Center, sat down with Say to discuss how Say’s work acts as a bridge between traditional Anatolian folk music and today’s modern Turkish compositions. Göknar and Say also discuss the idea of music as resistance.

Say’s residency was made possible, in part, with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with support from Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina (ATA-NC).

More about the artist:

Fazil Say’s Website

Fazil Say’s Facebook

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 4

CHINA AND THE SILK ROAD

with Professor Sucheta Mazumdar

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 239, HISTORY 323

This course introduces the rich and diverse world of trade, religions, and cultures that connected the two ends of the Eurasian world. The course starts with survey of Han and Roman trade contacts, and Chinese connections with India via Buddhism, focusing on 7th-15 centuries CE. Covers themes such as the coming of Islam and Nestorian Christians to China, travelers to China during the vast Mongol Empire including Marco Polo, and voyages of the Chinese admiral Zheng He to Africa at the beginning of the 15th century which opened up the maritime Silk Roads.

 

INDIAN CIVILIZATION

with Professor John (Rich) Richardson Freeman
(CCI, EI, W, CZ, SS)
 HISTORY 219, CULANTH 215, AMES 257
Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials.

 

AFRICAN CITIES

with Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu
(CCI, SS)
AAAS 640S, CULANTH 562S
If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life–the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent–from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town–and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies.

Duke’s Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

Duke University’s certificate programs offer you the opportunity to diversify your degree by studying a topic or theme that spans multiple departments and disciplines. The Asian Pacific Studies Institute’s (APSI) Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate strives to provide you with:

  • A broad introduction to East Asian Studies
  • An understanding of differing disciplinary approaches to East Asian Studies
  • A minimum proficiency in at least one East Asian language (200-level or above)
    • Duke offers courses in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Tibetan
  • The skills to undertake research on an East Asian topic

Requirements

  • You must take at least six courses from the designated East Asian certificate course list.
    • One gateway course for the certificate
    • One approved capstone seminar course
    • Four elective courses at the 200-level or above, including East Asian Language courses
  • No more than three courses should be taken in any one department or program
  • You are required to develop an online portfolio that reflects your accomplishments in the certificate program.
    • Including at least 12 entries with your six certificate courses reflected
    • A digital reporting of how each piece meets the certificate goals

Application

You are encouraged to declare your interest in receiving a certificate in East Asian studies by your fifth semester.

East Asian Studies Certificate Application Steps:

  1. Register for the certificate electronically through ACES by completing a “long-range plan” and a “what if” report. Questions about this process should be directed to your Academic Advisor.
  2. Contact APSI at apsi@duke.edu or 919-684-2604 with a notification about your intention to complete the certificate. Set up an appointment for advising to learn more about specific course offerings and other important certificate requirements.

 

Fall 2016 Courses Offerings

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate gateway courses: 

Gateway Seminar: Asia Global History with Professor Prasenjit Duara

HISTORY 162S

(CCI, CZ, SS)

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

Emerging Markets with Professor Giovanni Zanalda

ECON 379, ICS 379 – Prerequisites: ECON 205D, ECON 208D and ECON 210D

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

This course analyzes the rise of emerging markets/economies and their new roles in the context of global economy. This course focuses on the post-1970s growth of countries such as China, India, South Korea, Chile, Mexico, and Brazil (and/or other countries according to students’ interests) with particular emphasis on financial, industrial/trading and institutional aspects, linking such rise to the emergence of vast global economic imbalances and new trend in capital and trade flows of the last decade. The coursework will explore economic and policy challenges these countries and their companies increasingly face and implications for the world economy.

 

Democracy and Social Choice with Professor Emerson Niou

POLSCI 333S

(CCI, SS)

This course introduces students to the study of social choice and democratic theory. Social choice theory studies the properties of political institutions by which individual preferences are aggregated into collective choices. It provides a useful and powerful analytical framework to understand the choice and consequence of various political institutions in various democratic political systems. Course topics include politics of suffrage, secret vs. open ballot, electoral systems, representative districting, term limits, presidential vs. parliamentary systems, party formation, coalitional government, etc.

 

Interethnic Intimacies with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S/515S; LIT 415S, AMI 415S, CULANTH 415S, VMS 416S, ICS 415S

Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar.

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The coursework examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other.

 

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate capstone seminar course:

East Asian Treaty Ports with Professor Simon Partner

HISTORY 518S

(CCI, R, SS)

The course will examine the treaty ports of East Asia: Shanghai, Tianjin, Yokohama, Nagasaki and others from the perspective of both foreign and local residents. Students will review available English language sources, and carry out a research project on a city of their choice.