Spring 2017 Awards, Grants, & Scholarships

The Franklin Center’s area studies programs support and administer several awards, grants, and scholarships for Duke undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. Below is a list of opportunities all with upcoming deadlines. Click the links for more information and to apply.

FEBRUARY DEADLINES

This merit-based scholarship supports full-time students in the Duke in China summer program. Preference is given to students demonstrating a strong and sustained interest in Chinese and China Studies as well as those with no other sources of financial aid. 

Faculty needing assistance to cover travel expenses for presenting on East or Southeast Asian topics at conferences and professional meetings may apply for up to $700 from APSI.

Provides graduate students working on international research topics with funding for travel to archival and research sites inside and outside the continental United States, for attendance at specialized conferences, or for foreign language & methods training. Awards range from $500 to $2,500.

Provides funding for full-time Duke undergraduate students to complement their classwork with research experience in different social and cultural settings. On average, DUCIGS makes five awards of up to $2,000 each annually.

With funding provided by the U.S. Department of Education, DUMESC invites undergraduates and graduate students to apply for the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship. The awards provide stipends of $2,500 each plus remission of tuition and registration fees up to $5,000 for one summer session. DUMESC awards FLAS fellowships for the study of Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Urdu.

Full-time graduate and professional school students who are US citizens or permanent residents may apply to engage in language and area studies training on Latin America and Caribbean.  Priority:  Less commonly taught languages. 

MARCH DEADLINES

This program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students who conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. The student’s application must be submitted through the appropriate channels at his/her university, and transmitted to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) by the university’s Project Director.

APSI provides merit-based tuition fellowships to East Asian Studies MA students. All students applying to the program are considered for first-year funding during the application process; no separate application is needed. Students should apply for the second-year award of a $10,000, one-semester grant in the spring semester of their first year.

These awards provide opportunities for Duke undergraduates to complement class work with research experience in Latin America and the Caribbean (includes Puerto Rico and US-Mexico border region).  The awards are open to all fields and subjects.  Approximately 10 awards ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 each will be offered. 

This grant supports student projects with the goal of furthering Asian-American understanding, as well as funding need-based grants for students to study in Asia. Duke undergraduate and graduate students may apply.

Special consideration will be given to projects connected with Asian-American relations, Asian-American cultural or legal issues, and women’s issues, but any project designed to meet a need and which encourages student leadership initiative will be considered.

Limited funding is available to full-time Duke students who plan to go to Japan or Korea to study a language. Priority is given to students who 1) wish to continue language study after finishing Duke University’s language requirement of three semesters, 2) are majoring or minoring in Japanese, Korean, or AMES, and 3) have arranged affiliations with local institutions in Japan or Korea.

The maximum award will be $1500.

The award is not need-based; however, should the recipient be on financial aid, the amount of the scholarship will be used to reduce the self-help portion of the financial aid award. The award is given to the student(s) who best embody the ideals and interests that Sirena held. Preference for the award will be given to students who:

• Are of Asian ancestry, preferably Chinese-American
• Have made a valuable contribution in the area of East-West culture, and
• Have demonstrated academic excellence

Full-time Duke sophomores and juniors may receive up to $2,500 to conduct research in China, Japan or Korea. Priority will be given to students who 1) will conduct research for a senior thesis; 2) whose projects have a high probability of developing into a senior thesis, and 3) who have done some preliminary work and have arranged affiliations with local institutions for the research.

APRIL DEADLINES

Grants of up to $3,000 are given to support research beginning in the summer and concluding by June 30 of the following year. Priority will be given to:

• Junior faculty or those with low/no alternate funding sources

• Faculty needing to travel to conduct East or Southeast Asia research

• Faculty who have not recently received APSI funding

• Faculty who have done conspicuous service for APSI

MAY DEADLINES

APSI annually provides up to $3,000 in funding for research clusters that promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural inquiry and collaboration among East and Southeast Asian studies faculty and students at Duke University and other Triangle area universities.

 

Wednesdays at the John Hope Franklin Center – Spring 2017 Schedule

Wednesdays at the Center (W@TC) is a topical weekly series in which scholars, artists, journalists, and others speak informally about their work in conversation with the audience. This semester the John Hope Franklin Center is proud to collaborate with partners across Duke and throughout the larger academic community to present a discipline diverse series.

Join us on Wednesdays throughout the semester from 12:00pm – 1:00pm in the Franklin Center’s Ahmadiah Family Conference Hall, room 240. A light lunch is served at each event.

January 25, 2017 – Community and Student Filmmaking in Palestine: A Shorts Screening

with Professor Nadia Yaqub, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

February 1, 2017 – Understanding and Supporting Comprehensive Internationalization

with Professor Penelope Pynes, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

February 8, 2017 – Council for European Studies Society of Fellows 

with Malachi Hacohen, Director of CES; Eliza Bourque-Dandridge, Romance Studies; Thomas Prendergast, History; Carole Baker, Divinity; Kelly Alexander, Cultural Anthropology

February 15, 2017 – Trump in the Age of Captain America

with Professor Jason Dittmer, University College, London

February 22, 2017, Vienna – Duke Exchange: Scientific World Conceptions

with Duke’s Vienna Summer School graduate students

March 1, 2017, The War Against Rape as a Weapon of War

with professor miriam cooke, Duke University

March 8, 2017, Translocal Melancholy: Ba Jin’s Anarcho-Humanism in Republican Shanghai

with Daniel Rose-Burton, North Carolina State University

March 22, 2017, Presnitz in the piazza, Sissi in the Square: Central European Trieste

with Professor Maura Hametz, Old Dominion University

March 29, 2017, PINKS: Social Justice and Filmmaking in South Korea

with PINKS Collective

April 5, 2017, Iraqi Pioneer Art

with Dr. Nedda Ibrahim Drabick

April 12, 2017, Graduate Working Groups on Global Issues

with DUCIGS 2017 Working Groups

April 19, 2017, TBD

Haiti Remembered

by Catherine Angst

Today Jacques Pierre releases an artistic memorial video honoring the victims and survivors of the January 12th, 2010 Haitian earthquake. Pierre is the Haitian Creole lecturer at Duke University’s Department of Romance Studies and the co-director of Duke’s Haiti Lab. Pierre was born in Cap-Haitian, Haiti.

Seven years ago, Haiti experienced a devastating earthquake that took 230,000 lives and injured 300,000 people. Many countries from the around the world showed solidarity with Haiti during this catastrophic moment. Haiti has made substantial strides toward recovery since 2010. Pierre wants to keep the memory of the victims alive.

In 2015, Pierre coordinated a special commemorative service for the fifth anniversary of the earthquake at Duke Chapel. “The service was a symbolic way to grieve but, I didn’t want people to forget about the loss experienced by the Haitian people,” said Pierre. Shortly after that commemorative service, Pierre began what would develop into this digital memorial.

Over the past two years, Pierre has collected words of solace from around the world and many universities. People have shared their messages of love and support across this book’s pages.

Pierre says, “My hope is this video becomes a collective memory. I would like everyone to share their wishes and hopes for rebuilding Haiti.” Pierre plans to give the memorial book to Haiti which is in the process of constructing an earthquake memorial site.

What to Do About Venezuela

On October 27, 2016, Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies Director Patrick Duddy spoke on a panel entitled, “What to Do About Venezuela” as part of the HBO and the Council on Foreign Relations “What to Do About…” series.

Read more here: http://www.cfr.org/venezuela/hbo-do-venezuela/p38427

The video begins at 24.39:

 

Mexican Printmaker to Visit Duke, Durham to Celebrate Day of the Dead

by Jennifer Prather

Sergio Sánchez Santamaría, one of Mexico’s foremost printmakers, will visit Duke and the Durham community Oct. 21-29 to celebrate the Day of the Dead in North Carolina.

Sánchez Santamaría is a muralist, illustrator and printmaker who has taught and exhibited in the United States, Europe and Russia. The Frederic Jameson Gallery in the Friedl Building will display an exhibit of his works, “Printing Realities,” from Oct. 27-Dec. 9. An opening reception is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, in the gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Sánchez Santamaría will teach at Duke, the Durham School of the Arts and Durham Technical Community College, and will make a limited edition linocut print for Supergraphic, a printmaking studio located in Durham’s Golden Belt complex. He will also create an original mural for the Mural Durham Festival at the Duke Arts Annex, from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22.

read more: https://today.duke.edu/2016/10/mexican-printmaker-visit-duke-durham-celebrate-day-dead

 

Health and Healing in Africa

s17_history205Course numbers: HISTORY 205.01, GLHLTH 201.01


Course codes: CCI, STS, CIV, SS


Course description:

“Health and Healing in Africa” introduces students to how people in various parts of Africa experienced, explained, and treated “health” and “illness” before and during contact with biomedicine. We will examine how people chose, and continue to choose, from multiple etiologies and therapies, including biomedicine. The course stresses the particular historical contexts—i.e., the specifics of time and place—that shaped systems of health and healing. In particular, we will query the connections between illness, healing, and various forms of power including the powers of colonial states, nation-states, and the global post-colonial order.

Instructor: Professor Jan Ewald

Professor Ewald’s specialty in the history of Africa led her, in both teaching and research, to explore how Africans participated in the major currents of world history since about 1700. Professor Ewald’s book “Soldiers, Traders, and Slaves: State Formation and Economic Transformation in the Greater Nile Valley, 1700-1885” uses oral traditions as well as written sources to reconstruct how people in a dangerous frontier zone responded to predatory empires, commercial capitalism, slave raiding, and militant Islam. The book, as well as several articles, analyzes not only how people constructed a small kingdom but also how they continually reconstructed their memories of that kingdom.

Following the paths of slaves from the Nile valley led Professor Ewald to the shores of the Indian Ocean and beyond. Professor Ewald in now working on a second major project, “Motley Crews: Indian and African Seafarers on English Vessels in the Indian Ocean, c. 1600-1900.” This project analyzes two forms of labor control–indentures and slavery–in a maritime setting. Not only Africans, but also Asians and Europeans, are the main actors; center stage is the Indian Ocean bounded by the crescent of shore from Bombay through the Arabian coast to the African Swahili coast; the action takes lace in the tumultuous centuries, especially after 1750, when a system of slavery rose and fell; Asian and African autonomy gave way to European dominance; and steam engines replaced sailing vessels on the ocean

Rumi

s17_ames321
Course numbers: AMES 321, RELIGION 321

 

Course codes: CCI, R, ALP, CZ

 

Course Description:

Rumi is the iconic love poet of Islam, and one of the great mystical visionaries in history. This course explores Rumi’s traditional erotic love poetry, where human and Divine love mingle. All reads are in English. Open to all. No previous coursework required.

Instructor: Dr. Omid Safi

Dr. Safi is Director of Duke University’s Islamic Studies Center. He is the past Chair for the Study of Islam, and the current Chair for Islamic Mysticism Group at the American Academy of Religion. In 2009, he was recognized by the University of North Carolina for mentoring minority students in 2009, and won the Sitterson Teaching Award for Professor of the Year in April of 2010.

Omid is the editor of the volume Progressive Muslims: On Justice, Gender, and Pluralism, which offered an understanding of Islam rooted in social justice, gender equality, and religious and ethnic pluralism. His works Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam, dealing with medieval Islamic history and politics, and Voices of Islam: Voices of Change were published 2006. His last book, Memories of Muhammad, deals with the biography and legacy of the Prophet Muhammad. He has forthcoming volumes on the famed mystic Rumi, contemporary Islamic debates in Iran, and American Islam.

 

 

Indigenous Resistance & Revolution: Mexico and Central America

s17_latamer490
Course Numbers: LATAMER 490S, ROMST 490S, ICS 490S, CULANTH 490S

 

Course code: CCI, EI, CZ, SS

 

Course description:

Interdisciplinary study of geographical, historical, economic, governmental, political, and cultural aspects of modern Latin America and the current issues facing the region.

Instructor: Dr. Irma Alicia Velasquez Nimatuj

Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj is the 2017 Mellon Visiting Professor at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Duke University. She is an indigenous rights activist, journalist, and social anthropologist from Guatemala. She is the first Maya-K’iche’ woman to earn a doctorate in social anthropology and she initiated the court case that made racial discrimination illegal in Guatemala.

Screening the Holocaust: Jews, WWII, and World Cinema

s17_ames341Course numbers: AMES 341A, AMI 263S, JEWISHST 266S, LIT 263S

 

Course codes: CCI, EI, ALP, CZ

 

Course description:

Screening the Holocaust surveys WWII and Jewish Holocaust films from Europe, the United States, and Israel. The course explores divergent cinematic strategies employed to represent what is commonly deemed as “beyond representation”. The class will examine the heated debate spurred by a number of Holocaust films.

Instructor: Dr. Shai Ginsburg

Dr. Ginsburg is the Director of Undergraduate Studies at Duke University’s Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Department. Dr. Ginsburg’s research interests include Hebrew literature, Israeli cinema, critical theory, film theory, and nationalism.  His book, Rhetoric and Nation: The Formation of Hebrew National Culture, 1880-1990 (Syracuse University Press) was released in 2014.

Culture and Environment in Modern Chinese History

s17_history514Course number: HISTORY 514S
Course codes: CCI, EI, STS, CZ, SS
Course description:

This course is an examination of the changing patterns through which the physical environment and culture are mutually formed in late imperial and modern China. Culture includes the creation of cosmological and social ideas as well as the long-term practices of settlement and utilization of the environment. In what ways did cultures represent limits to environmental exploitation? Special attention will be given to how communities and the state respond to environmental disasters and explore the feedback loops for protection and prevention. This course explores the importance of long-term understanding for the current environmental crisis in China.

Instructor: Professor Prasenjit Duara

Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. He was born and educated in India and received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was previously Professor and Chair of the Dept of History and Chair of the Committee on Chinese Studies at the University of Chicago (1991-2008). Subsequently, he became Raffles Professor of Humanities and Director, Asia Research Institute at National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

In 1988, he published Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) which won the Fairbank Prize of the AHA and the Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA. Among his other books are Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and most recently, The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014). He has edited Decolonization: Now and Then (Routledge, 2004) and co-edited A Companion to Global Historical Thought with Viren Murthy and Andrew Sartori (John Wiley, 2014). His work has been widely translated into Chinese, Japanese, Korean and the European languages.