Left of Black

Left of Black

Left of Black is a weekly webcast hosted by Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal and produced by the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. Left of Black features interviews with academics, authors, artists and others discussing cultural issues.

 

 

The show is taped on Tuesday afternoons and broadcast the following Monday at 1:30 via UStream (http://www.ustream.tv/dukeuniversity). Show are then archived at http://leftofblack.tumblr.com/ and can also be downloaded at iTunes U (http://tinyurl.com/4o3d758). Follow the “live’ conversation about each episode @ http://twitter.com/LeftofBlack

 

About Left of Black

Duke University African and African American Studies professor Mark Anthony Neal has taken his role as the one of the university’s public intellectuals to a new level with his weekly program, “Left of Black,” featuring interviews with academics, authors, artists and others discussing cultural issues.

“I definitely see this program as an extension of my desire to make the knowledge produced in and by the university available to a wider public,” Neal said. “It is also a chance to highlight the ideas of folk who aren’t the standard talking heads.”

Neal, known for his progressive views on black male masculinity, describes the program as offering “a contrarian view of blackness,” or a perspective that goes beyond the status quo of what it means to be black. Blackness, he says, cannot be defined as “a political position in the left/right paradigm.”

The 45-minute show includes Neal interviewing two guests, in studio or by Skype, and introducing a “question of the week.”

“Left of Black” is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke. Catherine Angst, multimedia specialist, and Jason Doty, administrative manager, tape and produce the show from a customized basement studio.

“I find it incredibly inspiring that even with very limited resources and the wider expectation to ‘do more with less,’ the Franklin Center still finds innovative ways of using technology to address important issues of today,” Doty said.

Past episodes have featured:

— Spoken word poet Joshua Bennett speaking candidly about negotiating the constraints of black masculinity in the hip-hop era;

— Local author Zelda Lockhart revealing her struggles with the publishing industry;

— A discussion on how black mega churches have changed the way people worship, and the Morehouse College dress code with regular contributor and Morehouse professor Stephane Dunn;

— And, an exploration of portrayals of black female sexuality, and rape and the Civil Rights Movement.

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