Wednesday at the Center – Fall 2016

Wednesdays at the Center (W@TC) is a topical weekly series in which scholars, artists, journalists, and others speak informally about their work in conversation with the audience. The series is organized and presented by the John Hope Franklin Center with the support of partner organizations. All events in the series are free and open to the public. A light lunch is served at each event and an one hour parking voucher given to attendees.

September 7, 2016

Hamilton and Malcolm X: Radical Race Representation in Opera and Musical Theatre

Speakers: William Henry Curry, Durham Symphony Music Director and Raleigh Medal of the Arts Recipient; and Jackson Cooper, Classical Music and Theatre Critic for Classical Voice of North Carolina and the Greensboro News and Record

September 14, 2016

Whither Austria? Whither Europe? The Austrian Elections, Brexit, and the European Future

Speaker: Erhard Busek, President of the Vienna Economic Forum

September 21, 2016

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington

Speaker: Eric Farnsworth, Vice President of the Council of the Americas

September 28, 2016

What Duke’s collections can do for you; or, what is it we collect?

Speaker: Sean Swanick, Middle East and Islamic Studies Librarian, Duke University

October 5, 2016

The sacred and the healing potential in Ancient Oriental Music & Movement Therapy

Speaker: Dr. Oruc Guvenc, Turkish Music Therapist

October 19 2016

Adolescent HIV: How to Break the Mortality Wave

Speaker: Dr. Dorothy Dow, Duke Global Health Institute

October 26, 2016

From Isolation to Open-Access: Painting Myanmar in the 21st Century

Speaker: Catherine Raymond, Director of the Center for Norman Studies at Northern Illinois University

November 2, 2016

The Political Consequences of Terrorism

Speakers: Laia Balcells, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Duke University

November 9, 2016

The Crucible: From Politics to Process

Speaker: Mark Perry, Dramaturg of THE CRUCIBLE; 

Ray Dooley, Actor, playing Giles Corey in THE CRUCIBLE

Jeffrey Blair Cornell, Actor, playing  Deputy Governor Danforth in THE CRUCIBLE

Jules Odendahl-James, Director of Academic Engagement, Humanities, Duke University

November 16, 2016

Cuba and U.S. Relations: One Year Later

Speaker: Joan Perkins, Deputy Director, Office of Cuban Affairs, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, U.S. Department of State

November 30, 2016

 The Koran in English: A Biography

Speaker: Bruce Lawrence, Emeritus, Duke University

December 7, 2016

Global Graduate Working Groups

Speakers: 2016-2017 Duke University Center for International and Global Studies’ Graduate Working Groups

Fazil Say visits Duke

In February 2016, Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say visited Duke University as part of the Duke Performances’ artist-in-residence program. During his stay, Say preformed a sold out show, led a student chamber music intensive, met with the Turkish student association, and spoke on a public panel about music and culture in Turkey.

Erdağ Göknar, the director of the Middle East Studies Center, sat down with Say to discuss how Say’s work acts as a bridge between traditional Anatolian folk music and today’s modern Turkish compositions. Göknar and Say also discuss the idea of music as resistance.

Say’s residency was made possible, in part, with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and with support from Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the American-Turkish Association of North Carolina (ATA-NC).

More about the artist:

Fazil Say’s Website

Fazil Say’s Facebook

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 4

CHINA AND THE SILK ROAD

with Professor Sucheta Mazumdar

(CCI, CZ)

AMES 239, HISTORY 323

This course introduces the rich and diverse world of trade, religions, and cultures that connected the two ends of the Eurasian world. The course starts with survey of Han and Roman trade contacts, and Chinese connections with India via Buddhism, focusing on 7th-15 centuries CE. Covers themes such as the coming of Islam and Nestorian Christians to China, travelers to China during the vast Mongol Empire including Marco Polo, and voyages of the Chinese admiral Zheng He to Africa at the beginning of the 15th century which opened up the maritime Silk Roads.

 

INDIAN CIVILIZATION

with Professor John (Rich) Richardson Freeman
(CCI, EI, W, CZ, SS)
 HISTORY 219, CULANTH 215, AMES 257
Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials.

 

AFRICAN CITIES

with Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu
(CCI, SS)
AAAS 640S, CULANTH 562S
If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life–the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent–from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town–and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies.