Duke’s Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate

Duke University’s certificate programs offer you the opportunity to diversify your degree by studying a topic or theme that spans multiple departments and disciplines. The Asian Pacific Studies Institute’s (APSI) Undergraduate East Asian Studies Certificate strives to provide you with:

  • A broad introduction to East Asian Studies
  • An understanding of differing disciplinary approaches to East Asian Studies
  • A minimum proficiency in at least one East Asian language (200-level or above)
    • Duke offers courses in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Tibetan
  • The skills to undertake research on an East Asian topic

Requirements

  • You must take at least six courses from the designated East Asian certificate course list.
    • One gateway course for the certificate
    • One approved capstone seminar course
    • Four elective courses at the 200-level or above, including East Asian Language courses
  • No more than three courses should be taken in any one department or program
  • You are required to develop an online portfolio that reflects your accomplishments in the certificate program.
    • Including at least 12 entries with your six certificate courses reflected
    • A digital reporting of how each piece meets the certificate goals

Application

You are encouraged to declare your interest in receiving a certificate in East Asian studies by your fifth semester.

East Asian Studies Certificate Application Steps:

  1. Register for the certificate electronically through ACES by completing a “long-range plan” and a “what if” report. Questions about this process should be directed to your Academic Advisor.
  2. Contact APSI at apsi@duke.edu or 919-684-2604 with a notification about your intention to complete the certificate. Set up an appointment for advising to learn more about specific course offerings and other important certificate requirements.

 

Fall 2016 Courses Offerings

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate gateway courses: 

Gateway Seminar: Asia Global History with Professor Prasenjit Duara

HISTORY 162S

(CCI, CZ, SS)

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

Emerging Markets with Professor Giovanni Zanalda

ECON 379, ICS 379 – Prerequisites: ECON 205D, ECON 208D and ECON 210D

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

This course analyzes the rise of emerging markets/economies and their new roles in the context of global economy. This course focuses on the post-1970s growth of countries such as China, India, South Korea, Chile, Mexico, and Brazil (and/or other countries according to students’ interests) with particular emphasis on financial, industrial/trading and institutional aspects, linking such rise to the emergence of vast global economic imbalances and new trend in capital and trade flows of the last decade. The coursework will explore economic and policy challenges these countries and their companies increasingly face and implications for the world economy.

 

Democracy and Social Choice with Professor Emerson Niou

POLSCI 333S

(CCI, SS)

This course introduces students to the study of social choice and democratic theory. Social choice theory studies the properties of political institutions by which individual preferences are aggregated into collective choices. It provides a useful and powerful analytical framework to understand the choice and consequence of various political institutions in various democratic political systems. Course topics include politics of suffrage, secret vs. open ballot, electoral systems, representative districting, term limits, presidential vs. parliamentary systems, party formation, coalitional government, etc.

 

Interethnic Intimacies with Professor Nayoung Aimee Kwon

AMES 415S/515S; LIT 415S, AMI 415S, CULANTH 415S, VMS 416S, ICS 415S

Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar.

(CCI, EI, ALP, CZ)

This course is a critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or “intercourse” as represented from and about Asia. The coursework examines shifts within and beyond “Asia,” asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, post-colonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other.

 

Undergrad East Asian Studies Certificate capstone seminar course:

East Asian Treaty Ports with Professor Simon Partner

HISTORY 518S

(CCI, R, SS)

The course will examine the treaty ports of East Asia: Shanghai, Tianjin, Yokohama, Nagasaki and others from the perspective of both foreign and local residents. Students will review available English language sources, and carry out a research project on a city of their choice.

Global Asia Initiative

In the spring of 2016, Duke University’s Global Asia Initiative (GAI) launched its program on campus. GAI director, Professor Prasenjit Duara outlines the initiative’s mission in the above video.

GAI joined the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Inter-Asian Connections program as a Coordinating Partner and a hub for nodal research activities in March 2016.  The SSRC project has been active together with its coordinating partners in National University of Singapore, Hong Kong University, Yale University, Gottingen University and several other sponsoring partners across the world since 2008. It has held five international conferences and funded the research of over 50 junior scholars since then.  http://www.ssrc.org/programs/interasia-program/. By working closely with this global research network, it is hoped that Duke’s GAI, drawing on the resources of Duke and the Triangle area, will become one of its most important hubs in the US.

Global Asia Initiative website

 

 

Fall 2016 Featured Courses, part 3

JAPANESE CINEMA
with Professor Takushi Odagiri

(CCI, ALP, CZ) 

AMES 261, LIT 213, AMI 255, VMS 232

This course is an introduction to the history of Japanese cinema.  Focusing on the issues of relations between the tradition-modernity or Japan-West in the development of Japanese cinema, the influence of Japanese films on the theory and practice of cinema abroad, and the ways in which cinema has served as a reflection of and an active agent in the transformation of Japanese society this course provides a broad overview of Japanese cinema.

 

GATEWAY SEMINAR: ASIA IN GLOBAL HISTORY
with Professor Prasenjit Duara

(CCI, CZ, SS)

HISTORY 162S

The goal of the course is to first explore the most important networks and flows that connected the Asian region to the Eurasian world since the ancient Silk Route and the spread of Buddhism through the new dynamics of the Early Modern World, the 16th – 18th centuries. The second part of the course probes the new dynamics that integrated Asian societies through Western capitalism and imperial forces in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will also cover the ‘rise of Asia’ in the current era of globalization.

 

SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN EASTERN EUROPE AND ASIA
with Professor Mustafa Tuna

(CCI, EI, CZ, SS)

SES 375S, HISTORY 333S, POLSCI 359S, PUBPOL 282S

This course combines perspectives of political sociology and history questioning the respective roles of state policies and social movements in transforming societies. The course explores concepts such as social engineering, violence, revolution, totalitarianism, social movements, non-violent resistance, collective action and many others. This course reviews historically-informed case studies of: colonialism/anti-colonial movements (passive resistance and nationalism) in India; revolutionary communism, socialist reconstruction of society, everyday resistance and collective dissent in the Soviet Bloc; authoritarian capitalism and dissent in the form of environmentalist and anti-corruption movements in post-Maoist China.